Iowa football allegations: What former players said, when they played, which coaches they named

At least 55 former Iowa football players and one current player — most of whom are African American — have made allegations on social media about a culture of racism and bullying in the program.

With strength and conditioning coach Chris Doyle on administrative leave and an independent investigation to follow, The Gazette analyzed dozens of social media posts for a comprehensive look at what started it all.

UPDATE:On Monday, June 15, Iowa announced it had "reached a separation agreement" with Doyle, ending his 21-year tenure with the Hawkeyes.

What are the players saying?

The dialogue started Wednesday, June 3, after Iowa head coach Kirk Ferentz met with the media to discuss the conversation he had with his current team about the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis Police Department custody on May 25 and the nationwide protests for racial justice that followed.

Ferentz said that, if players were to kneel during the national anthem this season, he would want them to do that as a team. Chicago Bears offensive lineman James Daniels, who played at Iowa from 2015-17, tweeted “If the team collectively decides to kneel, this will bring about a cultural change for both Iowa football and the state of Iowa which I believe is long overdue!!!” Other players agreed.

On Thursday, June 4, Laron Taylor was the first to mention Doyle’s behavior. Jaleel Johnson replied. The conversation picked up again on Friday, June 5, when Faith Ekakite said “change begins with Doyle and his Strength & Conditioning staff” while quote-tweeting Ferentz’s appearance on SportsCenter with Scott Van Pelt.

Around nine hours later, Daniels followed with a message that has been retweeted 679 times as of June 11.

“There are too many racial disparities in the Iowa football program,” Daniels tweeted. “Black players have been treated unfairly for far too long.”

That seemed to encourage more players to come forward with specific stories of racism or other mistreatment or to verify the program’s issues. Here’s a timeline of what was said.

When were the players at Iowa?

Most former Hawkeyes that spoke out were in the program in the mid-2010s. In this chart, you can see how many players on each year’s team have used social media to allege racist behavior or bullying from coaches or confirm the program had problems.

Daniels, for example, is counted in 2015, 2016 and 2017, each year he was with Iowa.

The data does not include former players who have only said they’re supporting their former teammates without mentioning they experienced or witnessed issues.

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This doesn’t mean that only players from these teams have stories to share. It’s possible fewer players from other eras use social media. Still, it’s a good look at which years’ teams have members publicly advocating for change.

How successful were the players at Iowa?

The players who voiced concerns are not just disgruntled transfers. While 26 of the players who posted left Iowa before their eligibility expired, 19 earned All-Big Ten honors during their Hawkeye careers and 11 were NFL Draft picks.

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Where are the players from?

This map doesn’t look all that different than what a typical recruiting class looks like.

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However, only three of the players who spoke out are from the state of Iowa -- Dominique Dafney (West Des Moines) and Jack Kallenberger and Colin Sandeman (Bettendorf). Ten players are from Illinois, including nine from Chicago or the surrounding area.

Clearly, it’s not just players from one part of the country who have relayed their experiences.

Which coaches are named?

Here’s a look at how many times coaches have been specifically named on social media in a negative light.

At least22 former players have mentioned Doyle or the “weight room” as a problem, many with specific stories of racist behavior or bullying.

Kirk Ferentz was brought up negatively at least nine times, some with memories of mistreatment, others grouping him in with Doyle, who came to Iowa with Ferentz in 1999. But some players who want change, like Ekakitie, Johnson and Jordan Lomax, said they believe Ferentz is part of the solution moving forward.

Scroll down to find all the comments that made up this chart.

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Chris Doyle

Strength and conditioning coach, 1999-present. Has been placed on administrative leave.

Laron Taylor(LB, 2012-13): “(Doyle asked) me did I gangbang in the offseason cause I ain’t run track or wrestle.”

Faith Ekakitie(DL, 2012-16): “Coach Ferentz is one of the reasons I committed to Iowa as a high school senior. He cares, and he gets it. However, for this program in particular, real change begins with @coach_Doyle and his Strength & Conditioning staff.”

MarcelJoly(DB/RB, 2014-17): “I remember when I used to wear my tank tops in the facility, I used to get called in the coaches office because I had too much tattoos and it wasn’t the “Iowa culture” or the “Iowa Way”. BLACK PLAYERS HAVE BEEN TREATED UNFAIRLY FOR FAR TOO LONG!!!! WE DEMAND A CHANGE!!!! Starting with @coach_Doyle !!!!!!!!!!!!!”

Reggie Spearman(LB, 2013-14): “I personally believe Doyle and Kirk from my own experiences aren’t inclusive and understanding of young black athletes.”

Jordan Lomax(DB, 2011-15): “I have much respect for KF and other coaches on the staff as men of great integrity, principles, & morals and I am confident they have the ability be a part of the solution. As my brother @Faith_Joseph already mentioned, ‘the change starts in the weight room.’”

Manny Rugamba(DB, 2016-17): “I was lifting in the weight room and one of the lifts we had to do was open and close your hands in a bowl of rice, while walking to the bowl of rice one of my black teammates and close friends just left the rice station and was at the bench rack. After benching there was some rice left back on the bar. Coach Doyle then says ‘wtf is this s--- clean it up.’ The player walks over to clean it up and walks away from Doyle. Doyle then says, ‘why you walking wit all that swagger I’ll put you back on the streets.’ The kid comes from a happy home with both parents.

“A separate incident happened before one of our team lifts. He asked the same player where he was the night before the player says ‘my girl house.’ Coach Doyle then pull his pants halfway down to sag off his but turns his hat backwards puts one hand in his pants and starts to strut while mocking the player saying ‘I was at my giiirrrlllss house.’

“At 18-21 years old. Seeing others be treated like this made you walk around the football facility on egg shells. Unable to be yourself constantly trying to fit the Iowa Culture caused anxiety that could be unbearable at times with your dreams and career on the line.”

Terrance Pryor(LB, 2008-11): “While rehabbing after suffering a season ending injury, I had the following conversation with coach Doyle:

“Doyle: ‘Hey Pryor, you ever think that football isn’t for you?’

“Me: (Confused) ‘Not at all, why do you say that?’

“Doyle: ‘Maybe you should take up Rowing or something you know? Oh wait, Black people don’t like boats in water do they??’

“Me: ‘What??’

“This is one of may racist incidents that black athletes had to deal with during my time there.”

Darian Cooper(DL, 2011-15): “Doyle & I actually got into a physical altercation over my goal playing weight. I wanted to gain weight. Doyle responds by grabbing me by the stomach and making some rude comments. I end up having the push him against the complex to gett off me #iowafootball”

Cedric Boswell(DB, 2016-17): “My freshman year being on the campus, I was completely unaware of life living on my own and knew I was in a foreign environment and only wanted to learn the ropes. I was walking in the weight room one day, following the rest of the team to do our mandatory weigh-ins that we had every weel. There was water available next to the scales that we used and water was suggested for everyone to make sure that we were hydrated.

“I was one of the last guys at the time, still trying to get adjusted to the program, so I was rushed and wanted to catch back up with the team after weigh-ins were over. So I did not completely finish the water bottle that I had drunk and threw it away so I wouldn’t be late. Coach Doyle saw that I had threw away an almost empty water bottle and forced me to dig my hand in the trash can in front of the team. Shortly after, he made a big scene about it as if I was being made an example out of.

“This was a college football weight room, where athletes bleed, sweat, and vomit into those trash cans.”

Jaleel Johnson(DL, 2012-16): “Coach Doyle is the problem in that building. And so is Brian ferentz. Things won’t progress until those two fix themselves. They know they’re a problem. KF isn’t. I respect coach ferentz wholeheartedly. It’s the other in the building. Coach Doyle would go around stepping players fingers as they would warm up before a lift.

“I remember an incident where we were in a winter conditioning workout circuit, which was a pretty brutal workout lol, I had to catch my breath., My good friend miles Taylor yelled out to me ‘KEEP GOING LEEL WE NEED YOU’ ..

“All I heard was Doyle saying ‘NO WE DON’T, WE DON’T NEED HIM’ I was a senior. So that kinda took my confidence away.”

Jameer Outsey(LB, 2014-15): (Quoting Johnson’s first statement above) “Couldn’t have said it better!!”

James Daniels(OL, 2015-17): “I wouldn’t be in the league without Coach Doyle and BF. But Jaleel is right, change needs to start with those two.”

TerranceHarris(DL, 2014-15): “The root to all the issues is Coach Doyle. He will throw out many different derogatory sayings or phrases trying to emulate the black culture. He once said to me that ‘he’d gladly send me back to the ghetto’ this type of content was normal from him”

“KF made me log roll for an entire practice for no real reason. I was seeing stars and throwing up blood.. after practice coach Doyle told me I deserved it and made me run some more. This was the day I knew there was some deep issues in this program.

“Doyle definitely looks at players as property not humans.”

Brandon Simon(DL, 2016-17): “The University of Iowa Football program specifically the head strength and conditioning Coach Chris Doyle implemented a culture that would be biased and prejudice towards every Black American that would walk through their doors. The Iowa Culture Chris Doyle led and that Coach Ferentz oversaw was not welcoming nor accepting of the different cultures. They made little to no effort to get to know their black student athletes on a personal level. I knew this first hand when Doyle made that inaccurate statement that my ex-teammate and friend mentioned, telling me ‘to go back to the streets’ I’m not from the ‘streets!!!!’ I went to Don Bosco Preparatory High School in Ramsey, NJ. and grew up in a beautiful house with loving parents!!

“Coach Chris Doyle must think all black people in America must come from the ‘streets’ and have no guidance. His statement exemplifies what he perceives of black people and our culture! His belief is that they have to conform to a culture that looks like him in order to succeed. This attitude has led to the high transfer rate of many black student athletes and some quitting football all together. I believe athletics are meant to be inclusive and accepting of all backgrounds, The University of Iowa football program was not!”

Diaunte Morrow(DB, 2007-08): “Doyle made a comment about sending back to the GHETTO. I called him out on it in front of the entire team. I was suspended, KF told me I was out of line and needed to apologize for standing up for myself.

“I’ll say this KF has backed Doyle for years, so safe to say he very aware of what goes on. Doyle relays the messages for KF. KF is not innocent by any means. I have multiple witnesses for my situation.”

Derrell Johnson-Koulianos(WR, 2006-10):Shared stories of mistreatment from Doyle and Kirk Ferentz in a post that has since been deleted by HawkeyeNation.com.

Jack Kallenberger(DL, 2017-18): “I’ve struggled with ADHD all my life and have been on medication for it for as long as I can remember. People in the Iowa football program were aware of my learning disability. I enrolled at Iowa in June of 2017 and wasn’t tested in the hospital for a learning disability until spring of 2018 (I also needed to be tested to have access to medication). Durig that semester and a half period, I nearly failed out of Iowa because I struggled to pay attention in class, focus on my assigned readings, and not day dream during exams. All of these struggles were due to the chemical imbalance that hindered my ability to focus as the human brain should.

“... I often struggled to hold conversations with Chris Doyle because he was another coach that enjoyed to remind me that I’m dumb. One Sunday after a lift, some guys and I were talking about movies that just came out. Doyle overheard this conversation and said ‘Kallenberger, how about you open a f---ing book instead of watching movies.’

“We have to read a book as a team every January, assigned by the strength staff. We are quizzed over it once a week. I remember already being overwhelmed with school (learning curves are bigger for me due to my inability to focus so school took more time for me) and then had the anxiety of getting my pages read for this book quiz from the strength staff. I failed our first quiz over the book and Doyle said to me in the weight room, ‘is the book too hard or are you too stupid?’

“... I quit football not because of school but because I was broken, beat down, bullied, unwanted and unloved. I was stripped of every ounce of self confidence I had. I wouldn’t speak in classes out of fear that I was going to be called dumb, because that was my reality for 2 years in the Iowa Football building. I was forced to forget about my learning disability (much like the coaches ignored it) and forced to believe that I was a stupid individual.

“At Iowa, if you don’t fit the mold, you’re an outcast and will be treated accordingly by many of the coaches on staff.”

Anonymous: A former player, who is white, told HawkeyeNation’s Rob Howe that “Doyle can definitely make some very questionable comments at times, I can’t remember specific quotes but I can specifically remember a feeling of unease they gave me and just knowing they weren’t right to say.

Marvin McNutt(QB/WR, 2007-11): “What happens with Coach Doyle is huge,” McNutt told The Athletic. “The black community right now and the guys that I know I went to school with are very upset. They do remember how it felt to be berated by somebody.”

McNutt also confirmed that Doyle forced Johnson-Koulianos to “hold a trash can during a practice.”

Matt Hankins(DB, 2017-present):As for the issues dealing with Doyle, I would like to personally say, after returning for my fourth semester after the Outback Bowl, it was our first day in the building, we just had a 30 min body measurement (height & weight). As I was waiting to do the next activity, I was leaning on a cart, and Doyle came over and said that we was only going to be in the weight room for less than 45 min and told me not to lean. I apologized and got up immediately. That was when I spit on the turf (force of habit), and immediately after started to get yelled at. I was confused because I truly didn’t know what I was getting yelled at for. I’ve seen some of my older white teammates do it before I didn’t think anything was wrong. He then started saying ‘you think you’re better than everyone’ & ‘you haven’t done s--- for this program,’ which I still haven’t, but he didn’t need to do all of that. He then proceeded to kick me out for the remainder of the activity. The very next day a white player spit on the same indoor turf in front of Doyle but nothing was done. Didn’t get kicked out nor did that player get yelled at. This past week I’ve talked to a few of my teammates (not just the black members) and even some coaches. What I got out of those conversations was that with Doyle being gone, anxiety has been lifted of the shoulders of many of us. People aren’t afraid to speak up, & folks are starting to have fun again. Change is coming to this program, and I couldn’t be more proud to say I will be a part of that change!

Maurice Fleming(DB, 2012-15): "I can recall having my dreadlocks wasn't 'the Iowa Way.' Coach Doyle would go out of his way to antagonize me for having dreadlocks, which made me feel very uncomfortable and unwelcome. During the recruiting stages, there wasn't an issue with my hair as far as I knew and I felt accepted. It wasn't until I signed my letter of intent things started to unfold. Eventually I got tired of hearing the comments about my hair and sadly I had my dreadlocks removed. Strangely enough, Coach Doyle commented saying, 'Reese if I had a daughter, I'd let you date her. Now it looks like you're ready to play some football!' I'm assuming he was now pleased with my appearance.

"On a second occasion I had to confront coach Doyle in the presence of my teammates and other strength coaches when he used the N-word. A teammate and I were next to each other while competing during sprint workouts. We were racing 10 yards and my teammate grabbed my arm to slow me down and I became agitated and Coach Raimond confronted me saying 'what are you mad at Fleming, you clearly lost?' I replied, 'this N-word grabbed my arm.' Coach Doyle response was, 'this N-word, this N-word.' Mimicking with a smirk. After i heard that response we exchanged words and a few of my teammates held me back and told me to relax and calm down because Coach Doyle was too powerful and would get me removed from the program.

"At the University of Iowa Coach Doyle thought it would be smart to initiate a Draft Day. Draft Day is where the entire team and coaching staff pick captains by the majority of votes (similar to the NFL draft). During Draft Day captains receive sheets of paper with listings of players' GPAs, body weight, attendance of class, weight lifting goals, etc. It was based upon a point system and teams would receive more points for academic ability and body weight, rather than physical ability. Whichever team would win during offseason training would get a prize and special privileges. In a sense it felt like an experiment and somehwat dictated on who the coaches could trust to put on the field when the season would start.

"All in all race played a huge role. Majority of white players were drafted in the early rounds and blacks were drafted after. As a Black player it affected my mental health because it pressured me to be perfect in every category to be accepted by the coaching staff and my teammates. I was physically and mentally exhausted. Once during conditioning I told the coaches something was wrong and I didn't feel right. They told me to keep pushing. I did then I fainted which required medical attention caused by high blood pressure and dehydration. The issue behind me fainting was that I was expected to meet my body weight goals for my teammates and not get bad mouthed by my coaches for points."

"It is unfortunate that the color of my skin forced me to assimilate to the Iowa way yet and still it was not good enough for them. Over the years I've developed PTSD from the incidents that took place under Coach Ferentz and Coach Doyle's leadership."

Akrum Wadley(RB, 2013-17):"My time at Iowa has done things to me that i am not going to discuss because knowing how these people treated me and other black athletes, I am done giving them power over me. But if I could do it all over again, I wish I never played for the Iowa Hawkeyes. I would not encourage any future athletes or parents to send your kid to go play for the Iowa Hawkeyes under that current coaching staff. My experiences with people outside of the program in the Iowa community are ones that I cherish and will be with me forever grateful for. My hope is my story and those of my teammates save others from the experiences, truths and mistake of playing under and for a coaching staff at Iowa that did and said nothing to stop the bullying and racism from happening to us under Chris Doyle, Brian Ferentz and Kirk Ferentz. What you see on TV isn't what you get behind closed doors."

Kirk Ferentz

Head coach, 1999-present.

Reggie Spearman(LB, 2013-14): “I personally believe Doyle and Kirk from my own experiences aren’t inclusive and understanding of young black athletes.”

TerranceHarris(DL, 2014-15): “I remember being ridiculed with a few teammates for playing music while pulling into the parking lot. KF spit in our direction and told us we wouldn’t last long there. Simply because our choice in music.

“KF made me log roll for an entire practice for no real reason. I was seeing stars and throwing up blood.. after practice coach Doyle told me I deserved it and made me run some more. This was the day I knew there was some deep issues in this program.”

Brandon Simon(DL, 2014-15): “The University of Iowa Football program specifically the head strength and conditioning Coach Chris Doyle implemented a culture that would be biased and prejudice towards every Black American that would walk through their doors. The Iowa Culture Chris Doyle led and that Coach Ferentz oversaw was not welcoming nor accepting of the different cultures. They made little to no effort to get to know their black student athletes on a personal level.”

Diaunte Morrow(DB, 2007-08): “Doyle made a comment about sending back to the GHETTO. I called him out on it in front of the entire team. I was suspended, KF told me I was out of line and needed to apologize for standing up for myself.

“I’ll say this KF has backed Doyle for years, so safe to say he is very aware of what goes on. Doyle relays the messages for KF. KF is not innocent by any means. I have multiple witnesses for my situation.

“We also had minority ONLY meetings every time a teammate (black or white) got in some type of trouble on top of our team meetings. They meeting were held by the Associate AD (black man). KF is not ignorant by any means, he knows what goes on and does nothing about it.”

Marcel Joly(DB/RB, 2014-17): (Referencing Kirk Ferentz’s statement) “‘disappointed people didn’t come to him individually.’ That’s the whole point. You were part of the problem and created a culture where they couldn’t come to you.”

Javon Foy(WR, 2019): “While we were still in summer camp I had an incident with the police but did not get charged for anything nor did I receive any tickets. The officer told KF of the incident and in result I was suspended until after fall camp. When the season started I was then informed that I could not return until after the season. I was so hurt by what happened and didn’t understand why my career and well being were being played with as if I did not matter to anyone as if no one has made a mistake before.

“The end of the season came and I was yet again looking forward to rejoin my brothers I was called into a meeting where I was told I would have to get hip surgery that would put me out of football for 12 months. I was encouraged by KF to just quit football this last and final strike hurt me the most and I went to multiple specialists outside of the football program and learned my situation wasn’t anywhere near as serious as they made it out to seem. On top of this I found out a few of my white teammates were ticketed doing almost the same as me and received pencil rolls down the field as punishment.

“Throughout the process I saw my brothers grow and I couldn’t be there with them I was sorry for the mistake I made and learned from it. All I wanted was a fair and equal chance.”

Akrum Wadley(RB, 2013-17):"There was a press conference Kirk Ferentz had prior to us leaving for the Pinstripe Bowl game in New York, which is near my hometown in Newark, N.J. A reporter said to Kirk Ferentz, 'Coach it's a good thing you are going to New York because your star player Akrum Wadley, who's from New Jersey, can show you guys around.' Kirk Ferentz responded to him 'That's the worst thing about it!' It's hard to even see his face on most occasions. One of the many reasons I told several coaches that I wanted to and attempted to leave. I asked coach Broderick (Binns) to get me a therapist to speak to because no one in the football program would help us or listen to what we had to say. I can't remember her name. But I did meet with her one time to discuss my treatment at Iowa. She disappeared after that. No one told me where she went and no one was put in place for her after that. I didn't want to ask too many questions because we would get punished for anything and everything but nothing that we even knew of. Coach Ferentz would have Coach Broderick pass out the punishments but when I would ask he said he doesn't know but I just need to do it. I remember being late for one position meeting my entire career, which is the only time I knew what this 'punishment' was about. Kirk Ferentz made a way of not letting the athletes speak their mind about anything other than what and when he wanted us to speak.

"It wasn't just not being able to use social media or Twitter without his approval. I did tons of press conferences and interviews and before each one he would hand me notes and tell me don't say what you want, but say what's on the notes. When I would tell everyone that would listen I wanted to leave they would tell me no. It got to the point where Kirk Ferentz talked to my mom and asked her to convince me to stay. She wasn't aware of what was happening because he didn't tell her, nor did I in fear of what he and Brian Ferentz would try to do to me or my future. It was like deja vu all over again, when I watched the last press conference he did with the three student athletes. It reminded me of my whole career. He picked three guys he knew would not say what many of the guys were so upset about and spoke about in that previous team meeting. He also knew no one would take our word over his based on how they operate in the Iowa football program. He was arrogant and continued to let everyone know he's in charge. That's why Doyle and Brian Ferentz didn't speak. Kirk Ferentz didn't address any of the issues that I am writing this statement about today.

"I felt like playing for Iowa football was a living nightmare. I never drank alcohol prior to going to college but based on my experience there it became the only thing I could rely on it seems and was what I did to cope. Game day was the only day that it was somewhat of a relief for me, but even that became difficult based on what happened during the week leading up to it. It was clear to myself and other black teammates we were targeted to the extreme regarding not making Iowa's required weight. Trying to gain and maintain that weight in a workout after drinking pounds of Powerade and/or shakes right before working out. This made me very sick daily which included vomiting and my body aching. This was happening once a week but then went to happening everyday. I remember those that were in my group which were all Black transferred. As this was happening as I was trying my best to deal with this to help my teammates, I was threatened by Kirk Ferentz that my meal card would be taken away and I will not eat nor be able to sit with my teammates during eating sessions. He did follow through on his threat. I went to use my meal card and it was declined. I had to call my mother from New Jersey at 10 or 11 p.m. at night because I was hungry to order Dominoes Pizza for me. Or I would have to go to a fan's house earlier at night to eat because there was no way I was going to be able to make it through the next day vomiting, being weak and be able to make it through school and practice that day."

"My time at Iowa has done things to me that i am not going to discuss because knowing how these people treated me and other black athletes, I am done giving them power over me. But if I could do it all over again, I wish I never played for the Iowa Hawkeyes. I would not encourage any future athletes or parents to send your kid to go play for the Iowa Hawkeyes under that current coaching staff. My experiences with people outside of the program in the Iowa community are ones that I cherish and will be with me forever grateful for. My hope is my story and those of my teammates save others from the experiences, truths and mistake of playing under and for a coaching staff at Iowa that did and said nothing to stop the bullying and racism from happening to us under Chris Doyle, Brian Ferentz and Kirk Ferentz. What you see on TV isn't what you get behind closed doors."

HawkeyeNation.com’s Rob Howe alsoreported that Wadley’s mother, Sharonda Phelps, said Brian Ferentz “twice asked her son if he was going to rob a gas station and a liquor store on another occasion. Phelps brought that to Brian's father, Iowa head coach Kirk Ferentz, in Jan. '18.”

Derrell Johnson-Koulianos(WR, 2006-10): Shared stories of mistreatment from Ferentz and Chris Doyle in a post that has since been deleted by HawkeyeNation.com.

Maurice Fleming(DB, 2012-15): "Over my four years at Iowa I attempted to transfer three times. But every time I did Kirk Ferentz would give me hell about it. He would do things to manipulate the situation by not assisting in directing me to the people needed to facilitate my request. He'd tell me to go sleep on it for 24 hours and then act like I never asked, or call my mom and tell her to tell me to stay. My first request came in my freshman years as I spoke with Iowa and Kirk Ferentz specifically about the position I wanted to play and if that would be the case at Iowa. I was told yes 100%. After I signed my letter of intent and the day I stepped foot on campus. They told me I was going to be a WR. It was clear on how things would be with the treatment of my culture, hair, and my Black teammates. The amount of lies that were told to my face by Kirk Ferentz before and as soon as I arrived, I knew this wasn't the place for me. My mom didn't know what was going on with me at Iowa until after I finally got to leave.

"On my final and first successful attempt to transfer, upon Coach Ferentz revealed who he truly is. During our final meeting he expressed that 'I need him in life and I'll never be anything without him, and that I was truly making a huge mistake.' After hearing those words it further confirmed my reasoning for leaving and taking my goals to West Virginia University where I had the opportunity to start and thrive. They gave me the opportunity to continue my football career. It is unfortunate that the color of my skin forced me to assimilate to the Iowa way yet and still it was not good enough for them. Over the years I've developed PTSD from the incidents that took place under Coach Ferentz and Coach Doyle's leadership."

Johnathan Parker(RB, 2013-16): "Outside of my teammates there is nothing I can look back and say I got from Iowa except depression, anxiety and self doubt that Kirk Ferentz was well aware of. Nothing happens in IOWA unless Kirk Ferentz knows about it."

Brian Ferentz

Offensive coordinator, 2017-present. Previously offensive line coach, 2012-16. Played at Iowa, 2002-05.

Cedric Boswell(DB, 2016-17): “I had just gotten a brand new tattoo. I am from Detroit, Michigan where it is common expression of oneself to get tattoos. The tattoo is a picture of the city that I am from, where I grew up and had most of my memories leading up to this day. Coach had asked exactly what my tattoo was of and I had explained it to him, for him to respond saying ‘That is is the stupidest thing I have ever seen.’

“I truly felt more uncomfortable not speaking on this issue, than I did actually stepping up to let people know what was going on.”

Jaleel Johnson(DL, 2012-16): Coach Doyle is the problem in that building. And so is Brian ferentz. Things won’t progress until those two fix themselves. They know they’re a problem. KF isn’t. I respect coach ferentz wholeheartedly. It’s the other in the building.

Jameer Outsey(LB, 2014-15): (Quoting Johnson’s statement above) “Couldn’t have said it better!!”

James Daniels(OL, 2015-17): “I wouldn’t be in the league without Coach Doyle and BF. But Jaleel is right, change needs to start with those two.”

Marcel Joly(DB/RB, 2014-17): “@CoachBFerentz I vividly remember you wishing injuries on my fellow teammates while in meetings. I want the best for the young ones coming in. WE DEMAND A CHANGE! @coach_Doyle i know you remember be. I’m all grown up up now! Let’s talk!

Akrum Wadley(RB, 2013-17):"During the winter, the Iowa coaches handed out black, wool Nike hats to all the players. When we finished practice while leaving the field I liked to put my hat on immediately because it was cold and when sweating I didn't want to get sick. One time when I was jogging to the facility, Coach Brian Ferentz says, 'Hey Akrum, are you going to rob a gas station?' I was so upset, but ignored him and kept going. This happened a couple more times in the same situation. The only difference is he said 'Akrum are you going to rob a liquor store?' Those other times I just looked back at him and shook my head because I knew responding to him would result in some type of unfair punishment.

"One morning I had an exam, I wanted to grab a shake that was made for me because I wanted to make weight before practice. So I went to the facilities to get it. I didn't want to be late to class. Knowing it would only be 15 to 30 seconds for me to grab it out of the refrigerator, I pulled into the back of the facility and pulled into an unmarked an unoccupied parking spot. I did that because finding a spot on campus would have caused me to be late or miss my exam. As I was getting back into my car to head to my exam, Brian sees me about to leave as he and the other coaches were on a jog. Brian then yelled to me, 'you dumb m-----f-----, who the f--- do you think you are! I will get you when I get back.' I got in my car and went to class not even focusing on my exam anymore. All I knew was I was angry, frustrated and numb all at the same time."

"I was sitting in a group meeting and it turned to the topic of my teammate Reggie Spearman who was coming off a bad knee injury but was still trying to practice through it. Brian Ferentz was telling our O-line that he can't stand him and he wishes someone would hurt him, he hates him and wishes he wasn't here. You could tell how practice went with the intensity when Reggie was in. After that season Reggie was gone before the next spring. Reggie was replaced in the lineup by Josey Jewell.

"My time at Iowa has done things to me that i am not going to discuss because knowing how these people treated me and other black athletes, I am done giving them power over me. But if I could do it all over again, I wish I never played for the Iowa Hawkeyes. I would not encourage any future athletes or parents to send your kid to go play for the Iowa Hawkeyes under that current coaching staff. My experiences with people outside of the program in the Iowa community are ones that I cherish and will be with me forever grateful for. My hope is my story and those of my teammates save others from the experiences, truths and mistake of playing under and for a coaching staff at Iowa that did and said nothing to stop the bullying and racism from happening to us under Chris Doyle, Brian Ferentz and Kirk Ferentz. What you see on TV isn't what you get behind closed doors."

Johnathan Parker(RB, 2013-16): "There was a play when I was on when I attempted to do my job and because I didn't do it up to the coach Brian Ferentz liking. He began yelling and screaming at me, kicked the garbage can and said to me in front of all the coaches "only a dumb ass Black player would do it like that." Coach (Phil) Parker came up to me after practice and told me I didn't do anything wrong.

"Then he said but even though you didn't do anything wrong I needed to apologize to Brian Ferentz. I went and spoke with Coach Kirk Ferentz after that and he told me even though you may not have been wrong. 'What do I look like siding with the players over the coaches?' After that I knew it was time for me to leave."

Rick Kaczenski

Previously defensive line coach, 2007-11.

LeBron Daniel(DL, 2007-11): “Told me ‘I guess all the good Glenville players go to Ohio State.’ Myself and several other players (black and white) were called ‘stupid m-----f---ers’ frequently for years.”

“If there is anything worse than hell, that was my life.”

Carl Davis(DL, 2010-14): “Facts of you was on there dline from 2007-11 yo life was hell. ‘First bus ride back to detroit Carl.’”

Phil Parker

Defensive coordinator, 2012-present; defensive backs coach, 1999-present.

D.J. Johnson(DB, 2018-19): In a tweet that has since been deleted, Johnson said his position coach (Parker) made an inappropriate comment.

Geno Stone (Johnson’s teammate) and Jovon Johnson defended Parker, but D.J. Johnson pushed back.

“Coach Parker is a problem. Just bc he treated YOU well doesn’t mean he treated everyone else that way. We not gone act like his actions are justifiable just because he got you in a better position. Can’t believe you gone sit here and be blind to everything he does on the daily in that program just because he treated you well because you were a huge part of the success of that defense.”

D.J. Johnson did say his “goal wasn’t to call out Phil Parker if y’all took it that way that’s on it. it was to shine light on the type of unjustifiable things that take place in that program that we have to deal with on the daily.”

Seth Wallace

Linebackers coach, 2016-present and assistant defensive coordinator, 2017-present. Previously recruiting coordinator, 2014-15. Previously graduate assistant, 2006-08.

Jack Kallenberger(DL, 2017-18): “I’ve struggled with ADHD all my life and have been on medication for it for as long as I can remember. People in the Iowa football program were aware of my learning disability. I enrolled at Iowa in June of 2017 and wasn’t tested in the hospital for a learning disability until spring of 2018 (I also needed to be tested to have access to medication). During that semester and a half period, I nearly failed out of Iowa because I struggled to pay attention in class, focus on my assigned readings, and not day dream during exams. All of these struggles were due to the chemical imbalance that hindered my ability to focus as the human brain should.

“The issues at Iowa began when a coach nicknamed me simple Jack. For those of you unaware, simple Jack is a mentally challenged character from the movie Tropic Thunder. I had never seen that movie before but my coaches and teammates were quick to tell me exactly who simple jack was. One coach was great at jumping on opportunities to bring me down and make me feel dumb. Matt Nelson and I had a tradition of giving each other belly bumps before every game and practice. This coach made comments about my so-called ‘lack of intelligence’ most morning on the practice field. This coach constantly told me how dumb I am. This same coach also constantly told my little brother (teammate Mark Kallenberger) how dumb I am. This same coach also suggested we create a new sign for a defensive call because I was too stupid for the old one apparently. One coach wrote my semester GPA on his position room whiteboard (my parents didn’t even know my GPA as consent laws protect it).”

Kallenberger later named Wallace as the coach he was referencing.

“... I quit football not because of school but because I was broken, beat down, bullied, unwanted and unloved. I was stripped of every ounce of self confidence I had. I wouldn’t speak in classes out of fear that I was going to be called dumb, because that was my reality for 2 years in the Iowa Football building. I was forced to forget about my learning disability (much like the coaches ignored it) and forced to believe that I was a stupid individual.

“At Iowa, if you don’t fit the mold, you’re an outcast and will be treated accordingly by many of the coaches on staff.”

More coverage

Iowa football has an uplifting day on social media, but the internal discussion on race continues

Iowa football 'can be made stronger' after former players spoke out. Here's how.

Iowa strength coach Chris Doyle offers a defense on Twitter; Kirk Ferentz talks upcoming review of the strength program

Podcast: What's next for Iowa football after racism allegations

l Comments: (319) 398-8252; nathan.ford@thegazette.com