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Lawyer Bill Shuttleworth remembered for community service

Bill Shuttleworth active with Coe, Orchestra Iowa

Bill Shuttleworth of Cedar Rapids looks at old Cedar Rapids Symphony posters after the ceremonial wall breaking of the new symphony school in the Fawcett Building in 2004. (The Gazette)
Bill Shuttleworth of Cedar Rapids looks at old Cedar Rapids Symphony posters after the ceremonial wall breaking of the new symphony school in the Fawcett Building in 2004. (The Gazette)
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A Cedar Rapids lawyer on Monday is being remembered for his community service, keen legal mind, love of the arts and music and support of higher education.

William “Bill” Shuttleworth, 92, died Oct. 28 at his home. He was a partner in the law firm of Shuttleworth and Ingersoll until he became of-counsel in the late 1990s.

Rick Fry, a lawyer with Shuttleworth and Ingersoll, said Shuttleworth was a legal scholar.

”He was really a good lawyer, specializing in probate and real estate,” Fry recalled. “I think he was one of the first to condominiumize real estate in Iowa.

“He would study things very carefully before making a decision. I think some of that rubbed off on young people at the firm, including me.“

Jack Evans, who served on the Coe College board of trustees with Shuttleworth, said he learned a lot from his colleague.

“Regardless of the discipline, Bill was always interested, current and wanted to discuss the issues,” Evans said. “He stayed current on state tax law, property tax law and tax-exempt financing.

“When he got into a part of the law that he did not understand, he went to his partners.”

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Evans, chairman of the Hall Perrine Foundation, said his fellow Coe College life trustee was a “fixture in all substantive decisions.”

“Bill served two terms as chairman of the board of trustees, which is high praise to him as he was not a graduate of Coe.” Evans said. “He was the quintessential liberal arts fellow.

“Bill embraced the liberal arts and that’s why he loved Coe so much and Coe loved him. It could be on the athletic field, in an orchestra, in a play or a statement in the humanities, Bill would embrace it. He was very loyal to the college, very generous and very loved. He was really a Renaissance man.”

Shuttleworth, along with his wife, Winifred “Teddy,” supported Coe’s music and humanities programs and established the Shuttleworth Chair in History and the Shuttleworth Pre-Law Award.

“Bill had an absolutely wonderful marriage,” Evans said. “Teddy was right there beside Bill at the different athletic and cultural events.”

Shuttleworth supported Orchestra Iowa, was a board member and chairman of its foundation, and recently established the Shuttleworth Chamber Series.

“Orchestra Iowa has lost a dear friend,” Music Director Tim Hankewich said. “Bill Shuttleworth was a passionate musician and an even more compassionate man.

“His generosity and love for the symphony will long be felt by the Orchestra Iowa family. His joy for music and live performance was shared by everyone who was fortunate enough to have known him.

“My one regret was not having the privilege of hearing him play the piano.”

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Shuttleworth began his lifelong love of music by playing the French horn in the Franklin High School orchestra and band. Later in life, piano became his main instrument, and he enlivened many family gatherings and parties.

”Bill would play at (law) firm events,” Fry recalled. “It didn’t take much coaxing to get Bill to play the piano.”

Shuttleworth also was interested in world affairs and the pursuit of peace. He was active in the Iowa Division of the United Nations Association, serving as a director and officer from 1957 until 2013.

He also supported the University of Iowa International Writing Program.

Shuttleworth is survived by his wife, and their children, Jeff, Jane and Amy Shuttleworth; his grandchildren, Will and Judy Philips; and his nephew, Alexander Craven Sarkis.

A celebration of his life will be held at the Cedar Rapids Country Club at 2 p.m. Dec. 7.

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