CORONAVIRUS

Iowa adds 716 COVID cases, 35 deaths on Tuesday

Linn County adds 34 new cases, one death

Medical staff take a nasopharyngeal sample for the novel coronavirus COVID-19 test at the Test Iowa site, 5755 Willow Cr
Medical staff take a nasopharyngeal sample for the novel coronavirus COVID-19 test at the Test Iowa site, 5755 Willow Creek Dr. SW, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. The site provides protection from winter weather for medical staff and testing subjects. (Jim Slosiarek/The Gazette)

Iowa added 716 new COVID-19 cases and 35 new, confirmed deaths Tuesday.

The new numbers bring Iowa’s totals to 325,382 cases and 5,145 deaths, according to the Iowa Department of Public Health. The state’s seven-day average is 720.

The new cases come from 2,952 tests in the 24-hour period as of 11 a.m. Tuesday.

New cases

Locally, Linn County added 34 new cases for a total of 18,914. The county’s seven-day average is 47.

Johnson County reported 23 cases, bringing the county total to 12,699. The county’s seven-day average is 27.

Of the new cases on Tuesday, 131 were youths up to age 17, bringing the total number of minors in Iowa infected with the virus to 36,010.

Confirmed deaths

The 35 deaths reported on Tuesday happened between Dec. 17 and Feb. 6, according to IDPH data.

Nineteen of the deaths reported were of people over 80 years old, 13 were people ages 61 to 80 three were between 41 and 60.

Lyon County reported three confirmed, new deaths. Two deaths each were reported in Allamakee, Black Hawk, Boone, Emmet, Madison, Marion, Scott and Wright counties.

Counties that reported one new death each include: Linn, Cerro Gordo, Clayton, Des Moines, Dubuque, Fayette, Hardin, Lee, Louisa, Mahaska, Monona, Osceola, Polk, Pottawattamie, Union and Van Buren.

Hospitalizations

Across the state, hospitalizations went up from 318 to 327. Patients in intensive care went down from 69 to 67, and patients on ventilators went from 35 to 29.

Long-term care facilities

As of Tuesday, 35 of Iowa’s long-term care facilities were experiencing virus outbreaks, according to IDPH data. Within those facilities, 943 people were positive with the virus. Since the start of the pandemic, 2,105 people within facilities have died of COVID-19.

Vaccinations

As of Tuesday afternoon, the total number of doses was up to 364,642, with 348,659 of those being given to Iowa residents. The number of people with the first dose was 173,358, and the number who have completed the vaccination was 95,642.

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In Linn County, 26,368 doses have been given, and 6,771 people, or 2.99 percent of the population, have completed the vaccine.

In Johnson County, 27,759 doses have been given, and 9,006, or 5.96 percent, have completed the vaccine.

Front-line health care workers, residents and staff at long-term care facilities, and Iowans 65 and older are eligible to receive vaccines now.

For Iowans under age 65, you may qualify for a vaccine if you meet criteria in the groups below. The tiers of Phase 1B are ranked in order of vaccination priority:

• Tier 1: First responders such as firefighters, police officers and child welfare social workers; school staff and early childhood education and child care workers.

• Tier 2: Food, agriculture, distribution and manufacturing workers who work or live in congregate settings that don’t allow for social distancing; people with disabilities living in home settings and their caregivers.

• Tier 3: Staff and residents in congregate living settings that include shelters, behavioral health treatment centers, sober living homes and detention centers (but not college dorms); government officials and staff working at the Iowa Capitol during the legislative session.

• Tier 4: Inspectors responsible for hospital, long-term care and child safety.

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• Tier 5: Correctional facility staff and incarcerated people in state and local facilities.

Those who don’t meet these criteria will have to wait. The state will announce when other ages and occupational categories qualify.

The Gazette’s John McGlothlen contributed to this report.

Comments: (319) 398-8255; gage.miskimen@thegazette.com

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