CORONAVIRUS

Seven more deaths - including six in Linn County - as result of coronavirus

State officials announce 77 more positive cases

Iowa coronavirus deaths by April 12, 2020
Iowa coronavirus deaths by April 12, 2020

More than 40 percent of the 41 Iowans who have died as a result of the novel coronavirus so far were from Linn County, according to figures released Sunday by state health officials.

The Iowa Department of Public Health said Sunday that seven more people, all over the age of 60, have died as a result of COVID-19. Six of the seven were Linn County residents — two adults between 61 and 80 and four adults aged 81 years and older. The death of one adult aged 81 or older in Washington County was also included.

In total, 41 Iowans have died as a result of COVID-19 since the respiratory virus was first identified in the state a little over a month ago.

State public health officials also announced Sunday that 77 additional positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 1,587 cases in all but 18 counties.

Among these new cases, eight are residents of Linn County, bringing the total to 243 cases and maintaining its status as the county with the highest case count in Iowa.

State and local officials have confirmed that a portion of Linn County’s cases are tied to an outbreak in a Cedar Rapids long-term care facility, Heritage Specialty Care. Neither officials with the nursing home nor with the local public health department could be reached for comment Sunday on how many of the county’s new cases are tied to the facility.

Officials with Heritage Specialty Care announced over the weekend that as of Friday, 14 of its residents who tested positive for the coronavirus had died.

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As of Sunday, according to the state, 18 individuals overall in Linn County have died as a result of the disease.

So far, 60 residents and 30 staff at Heritage have tested positive, officials announced in a news release Saturday.

“As we continue to battle this virus, we are encouraged by the slowing rate of positive tests we are experiencing,” according to a statement from Heritage Specialty Care. “Of the 60 residents testing positive, 14 have recovered. Of 30 staff members testing positive 7 are back to work.”

According to the state public health announcement, Johnson County has eight additional positive cases for a total of 203 cases as of Sunday. The region is followed by Polk County with 177 cases and Scott County with 115.

The state Health Department noted in its announcement that Sunday’s results “do not reflect a complete 24-hour cycle of testing” as the department is transitioning to a new reporting time frame. The release did not provide details of that new time frame.

As of Sunday, 129 individuals were hospitalized in the state as a result of coronavirus-related symptoms, according to the Health Department. An additional 674 Iowans have so far recovered from the virus.

A total of 383 tests were negative for COVID-19 for a total of 16,005 negative tests to date.

According to the Health Department, the locations and age ranges of the 77 new cases are:

• Benton County, one older adult (61-80 years);

• Black Hawk County, one child (up to 17 years), one adult (18-40 years), two middle-age adults (41-60 years), one older adult (61-80 years), one elderly adults (81+);

• Buchanan County, one adult (18-40 years);

• Clinton County, one adult (18-40 years);

• Des Moines County, one middle-age adult (41-60 years);

• Dubuque County, one adult (18-40 years), two middle-age adults (41-60 years);

• Jasper County, one middle-age adult (41-60 years);

• Johnson County, one adult (18-40 years), seven middle-age adults (41-60 years);

• Linn County, two adults (18-40 years), three middle-age adults (41-60 years), two older adults (61-80 years), one elderly (81+);

• Louisa County, one adult (18-40 years), five middle-age adults (41-60 years);

• Lyon County, one adult (18-40 years);

• Marshall County, one middle-age adults (41-60 years);

• Muscatine County, four middle-age adults (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years);

• Osceola County, one middle-age adult (18-40 years);

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• Polk County, six adults (18-40 years), three middle-age adults (41-60 years), three older adults (61-80 years), two elderly adult (81+);

• Scott County, three middle-age adults (41-60 years), one older adult (61-80);

• Tama County, two adults (18-40 years), six middle-age adults (41-60 years), one older adult (61-80 years);

• Warren County, one middle-age adult (41-60 years);

• And Washington County, two middle-age adults (41-60 years).

Comments: (319) 368-8536; michaela.ramm@thegazette.com

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