CORONAVIRUS

COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations continue to set records in Iowa

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds arrives to update the state's response to the coronavirus outbreak during a July 7 news conferenc
Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds arrives to update the state’s response to the coronavirus outbreak during a July 7 news conference in Urbandale. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

The state on Wednesday reported 2,832 new COVID-19 cases, the second highest number of new cases in a 24-hour period since Oct. 30.

Hospitalizations continued to climb as well, with 777 Iowans being treated in Iowa’s hospitals as of 11 a.m. Wednesday. That is a record, for the 10th day in a row.

The number of patients being treated in intensive care units increased from 170 to 182, and those requiring ventilators to help them breathe rose from 59 to 63.

Twenty-five deaths were reported, a total that ties with May 22 as Iowa’s second-most deadly day. Only Oct. 20 had more deaths reported: 32.

The new cases bring the state’s total of virus infections to 136,126 since March, when the pandemic arrived in Iowa.

The state’s seven-day average is 2,371 cases per day, a record for the 12th day in a row.

The positivity rate among the 6,548 tests reported at 11 a.m. Wednesday was 43.25 percent, another record, according to the Iowa Department of Public Health

Of Iowa’s 99 counties, 61 have a 14-day positivity rate above 15 percent, including Linn County, where the 14-day average sits at 15.9 percent.

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Linn County reported 208 new cases Wednesday — the fourth highest number of cases added in a 24-hour period, bringing its total COVID-19 cases to 7,162.

The positivity rate Wednesday was 33.33 percent in Linn County.

The county’s seven-day average is 201 new cases, a record high for the 14th day in a row.

Johnson County added 95 new cases, with a positivity rate of 31.15 percent and its total number of cases since March to 6,426. The county’s seven-day average is 70.

Story County, home to Iowa State University in Ames, added 69 cases, with a positivity rate of 45.39 percent, as of 11 a.m. Wednesday. To date, the county has had 4,395 cases, with a seven-day average of 48 cases per day.

Black Hawk County, home of the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls, added 177 cases, the second highest number since Oct. 31, when 179 cases were reported. The positivity rate was 49.03 percent. Overall, 6,736 cases have been confirmed, with a seven-day average of 135.

Statewide, 284 of the new cases reported Wednesday involved children under the age of 17, the second highest number recorded in a 24-hour period since the 293 cases on Oct. 31. Cases among education workers increased by 127 cases, for a total of 6,847.

Deaths

The 25 deaths reported Wednesday included one each in Linn, Johnson and Benton counties.

Polk County reported three deaths. Counties reporting two deaths each were Black Hawk, Fayette, Pottawattamie, Scott and Sioux.

Other counties reporting one death each were Calhoun, Cass, Dubuque, Jackson, Marshall, Muscatine, Plymouth, Warren and Woodbury.

Long-term care

The state also added three long-term care facilities to its outbreak list — three or more case — and removed three others.

Added to the list were St. Anthony Regional Hospital in Carroll County, 13 cases; Heritage House in Cass County, 15 cases and three recoveries; and Corydon Specialty Care in Wayne County, 17 cases and one recovery.

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Removed from the outbreak list were Maple Heights Nursing Home in Monona County, ManorCare Health Services in West Des Moines in Polk County; and Fort Dodge Villa Care Center in Webster County.

Comments: (319) 398-8238; kat.russell@thegazette.com

John McGlothlen of The Gazette contributed to this report.

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