Government

Have your say on the new Cedar Rapids flag design

City plans to unveil new design next year

Fred Easker of Cedar Rapids, shows off the Cedar Rapids city flag he designed as a high school senior in 1962 outside of the Veteran’s Memorial Building on Monday, Oct. 4, 2004, in Cedar Rapids. The flag was rated 142 out of 150 city flags according to the North American Vexillological Association Flag Survey.
Fred Easker of Cedar Rapids, shows off the Cedar Rapids city flag he designed as a high school senior in 1962 outside of the Veteran’s Memorial Building on Monday, Oct. 4, 2004, in Cedar Rapids. The flag was rated 142 out of 150 city flags according to the North American Vexillological Association Flag Survey.

CEDAR RAPIDS — As Cedar Rapids launches an effort to design a new city flag, residents are being asked to share their ideas about what colors, shapes and symbols best represent the city of Cedar Rapids.

Or people can send in their own designs.

The launch of the flag redesign effort is being tied to Resident Appreciation Day, which is part of the Downtown Farmers’ Market from 7:30 a.m. to noon Saturday. City tents and vehicles will be set up on Fifth Street SE, between Fourth and Fifth Avenues near Greene Square and the Cedar Rapids Public Library.

“Attendees will be able to learn more about flag design and submit their ideas and designs for consideration,” according to a news release.

City vehicles, mascots, police fingerprinting, the city manager’s “one-bag challenge” for litter clean up also will be featured at the event.

The flag input period is through November, and residents will have multiple opportunities in person and online to weigh in. The city hopes to unveil a new flag at Resident Appreciation Day in June 2020.

The city flag had been called out in a flag association survey as one of the worst in the country, prompting the effort.

The city is advising the five basic principles of flag design, as articulated by the North American Vexillological Association:

l Keep it simple: The flag should be so simple it can be drawn from memory.

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l Use meaningful symbolism: The flag’s images, colors or patterns should relate to what it symbolizes.

l Use only two or three basic colors: Limit the number of colors on the flag to only a few that contrast well.

l Add no lettering or seals: Never use writing or an organization’s seal.

l Be distinctive or related: Avoid duplicating other flags, but you can use similarities to show connections.

People can submit ideas through an online form at CityofCR.com/cityflag. The form will accept PDF or JPG attachments under 5 MB.

l Comments: (319) 398-8310; brian.morelli@thegazette.com

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