CORONAVIRUS

What happens when a student is exposed to or tests positive for COVID-19?

Here's when a student should stay home and when they can return to school

A container of hand sanitizer is seen as a part of a kit given out to school nurses at the College Community School Dist
A container of hand sanitizer is seen as a part of a kit given out to school nurses at the College Community School District office in Cedar Rapids on Monday, Aug. 24, 2020. (Andy Abeyta/The Gazette)
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Here’s the protocol for students if they are exposed to or test positive for COVID-19, according to public health officials:

When to stay home

A student should stay home if having:

Any high risk symptoms, including a new cough, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing or a new loss of taste or smell.

Two or more symptoms considered low-risk for the coronavirus, including a headache, fatigue, nausea, sore throat, body aches, or vomiting or diarrhea.

A temperature at 100.4 degrees or higher — even without any other symptoms.

Been in close contact — within 6 feet for more than 15 minutes — with someone who tested positive for COVID-19.

Families should call the school and report any COVID-19 symptoms or exposures, as well as their health care provider for guidance and track their symptoms.

When to return to school

A student who has been in close contact with someone who tested positive for the coronavirus can return to school 14 days after the last exposure if they remain asymptomatic.

If a student tests negative for COVID-19, they still needs to quarantine for 14 days from the last exposure to a positive case.

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A student who tests positive can return to school when at least 10 days have passed since symptoms began, has had no fever for at least 24 hours and other symptoms have improved.

If a student has symptoms of COVID-19, no known exposure to the virus and a test result is negative, the student can return to daily activities 24 hours after a fever and other symptoms have improved.

Comments: (319) 398-8411; grace.king@thegazette.com

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Our most important Coronavirus coverage is free to the public.

If you believe local news is essential, especially during this crisis, please donate. Your contribution will support news resources to cover the impact of the pandemic on our local communities.

All donations are tax-deductible.