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Iowa head football coach Kirk Ferentz has 143 wins under his belt at the University of Iowa, one away from the all-time record.

The Gazette will count down each win, as ranked by writer Marc Morehouse.

108

Yeah, Iowa and UNI should play on a somewhat regular basis because blood is thicker than the MAC

No. 22 Iowa 45, Northern Iowa 21 | Sept. 17, 2005

Iowa's Chad Greenway breaks up a pass intended for UNI's David Horne on Saturday Sept. 17, 2005 at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City. (The Gazette)
Iowa's Chad Greenway breaks up a pass intended for UNI's David Horne on Saturday Sept. 17, 2005 at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City. (The Gazette)
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Three cool things:

1. All right, should Iowa play Northern Iowa?

Yes, it should. But Marc, you’re a UNI grad. You’re biased. Nope. The only time I ever hear from UNI is when it wants money. Comedian John Mulaney is right. I paid tuition. UNI educated me. Our transaction has concluded.

That’s purely speaking from my experience as an alumnus. As for UNI football, I’ve always enjoyed talking with Coach Mark Farley. I think one of the more interesting stories right now would be how he keeps that going and on budget. Someone do that.

Iowa should play UNI because who gives a rip if Iowa plays random MAC school? With UNI, at least there’s some blood in the water. We will get to the 2009 game, but I think the 2009 and 2014 games showed that if Iowa doesn’t come correct — and good Iowa teams, too — UNI can chalk it off.

Any given day.

You know that last summer Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany sounded the “all clear” for Big Ten schools to schedule FCS schools. I’m not saying Iowa-UNI should be annual. Maybe once every four years. The markets for the Group of Five schools rocketed after the Big Ten cut off the FCS for those few years (I think it was two or three). Iowa ended up paying in the neighborhood of $1 million for Miami (Ohio).

Pay UNI. Play UNI. It’s a no-brainer. As for basketball, that’s just some gutless crap not playing there. Why would they? Too much to lose, nothing to gain. If you want to be considered the premier basketball program in the state, maybe play the state programs.

When is the last time Iowa has been the premium basketball team in the state? Been awhile, hasn’t it?

I feel better. Thanks.

2. Speaking of UNI, Eric Sanders was a fascinating player. Skinny kid from Oelwein. QB’d the Panthers to a national championship berth. He introduced himself nicely here.

3. The Iowa State game happened the week before. I’m sure someone will parse the living daylights out of this, but Iowa State physically dominated Iowa that day. Once the Cyclones knocked Drew Tate out of the game, Iowa was lost. The Hawkeyes still had a great defense, but that was a little like the Packers losing Aaron Rodgers. Tate meant that much in that moment in time.

And then he “Tate’d.”

“I’m not going to change the way I play just because I got hit last week,” Tate said. “I was talking to my dad, and he said, `Just go play. If you get hit, you get hit. Who cares? Just go play.’”

I guarantee he said that with a glare for whomever asked the question.

Quote: Here’s the 1,000-yard stare you need to be great:

“I know I’m not doing the things I need to do to help us win games,” senior linebacker Chad Greenway said. “That affects me. I definitely need to make it better.”

Note: Greenway had a career-high 20 tackles in this game.

Why No. 108? — I advocated for Iowa and UNI to do this on a somewhat regular basis. I stand by that. Of course, they’re all not going to be gold doubloons.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE OF THE GAME

Game story from 2005

IOWA CITY — This won’t work at Ohio State. And they know it.

“If we make the same mistakes we made today against Ohio State, the game probably won’t be close,” Iowa cornerback Jovon Johnson said. “It would probably be a blowout.”

Receivers running free and clear, fumbles tumbling free and clear, quarterback running free and clear, this worked against Northern Iowa. And it will 10 out of 10 times. That’s how this Division I-A against Division I-AA goes.

Drew Tate threw a pair of touchdown passes to Clinton Solomon and Albert Young rushed for another two in the No. 22 Hawkeyes’ 45-21 victory Saturday before 70,585 fans at Kinnick Stadium.

Iowa’s offense, pounded into submission last week at Iowa State, looked almost ready for the Big Ten season. Except for a pair of fumbles.

Iowa’s defense, OK at Iowa State, looked ready for a non-conference do-over. The Panthers (2-1) put a pair of TDs on the board against Iowa’s first-team defense in the fourth quarter.

This won’t work for the Hawkeyes (2-1) as they begin their Big Ten Conference schedule next week at No. 9 Ohio State (2-1). Iowa’s last victory at Ohio State came in 1991. Iowa wins something like every other presidential administration at Ohio State.

“We’re still very much in the developmental stage as a football team,” Iowa Coach Kirk Ferentz said. “We’re going to have to get that cleaned up real quickly. We head into conference play, and I think we’re playing a pretty good team next week, if I remember correctly.

“We’re going to have to make a lot of improvement this week.”

Ohio State at Ohio State is a cold, hard fact capable of slapping anyone in the face. And they know it.

“There were times today when receivers got behind us, and the quarterback overthrew them,” Johnson said. “I’m sure Ohio State won’t make those mistakes.”

Johnson had a bittersweet day that sort of said it all for Iowa’s defense. He intercepted a pass and returned it 18 yards for a TD and a 21-0 Iowa lead with 11:51 left in the second quarter. But he also was on the burn end of UNI quarterback Eric Sanders’ 38-yard completion to Jamie Goodwin, spurring UNI’s final TD drive.

The game was over, sure, but that was still Iowa’s first-team defense giving up big plays, allowing an 85-yard scoring drive, making mistakes teams with serious intentions don’t make a week before Ohio State.

“I know I’m not doing the things I need to do to help us win games,” senior linebacker Chad Greenway said. “That affects me. I definitely need to make it better.”

This is Chad Greenway talking. All he did Saturday was collect a career-high 20 tackles. Twenty minutes after the game, he sees the flaws. He knows this won’t work at Ohio State.

“I still think we’re coming together,” Greenway said. “We still have to find ourselves. That has to happen this week.”

The Hawkeyes clicked on offense. Compared to last week’s effort at Iowa State, you’d have to say Iowa’s offense went through one of those extreme makeovers.

Tate completed 15 of 18 passes for 247 yards and two TDs. Solomon caught four for 114 yards, including a highlight-reel 71-yard TD. Young gained 97 yards on 13 carries, leading an Iowa rush attack that totaled 231 yards on 39 carries (a 5.9 average).

The Hawkeyes posted season highs in total yards (496), passing yards (265) and first downs (24).

“I thought we were better,” Ferentz said. “Let me preface that. It would be hard not to. But at least we looked a little more like a cohesive offensive football team.”

Tate shook off the effects of a concussion he suffered against Iowa State. He didn’t change his style an iota. He scrambled for 40 yards on Iowa’s first scoring drive, including a career-long 26-yarder.

“I’m not going to change the way I play just because I got hit last week,” Tate said. “I was talking to my dad, and he said, `Just go play. If you get hit, you get hit. Who cares? Just go play.’”

Sanders did his best Drew Tate impression, confounding Iowa’s defense with flair and daring. The 6-foot-1, 190-pounder led the Panthers with 49 yards rushing and completed 19 of 29 passes for 263 yards, three TDs and Johnson’s interception.

He showed poise in the pocket and patience when the Hawkeyes blitzed. He found holes in Iowa’s “Cover 2” zone coverage and had a field day with tight end Brian Cutright, a seasoned player who worked the middle of Iowa’s pass defense for four catches for 61 yards and a score.

“Our offense as a whole played well,” Sanders said. “Our offensive line did a great job and our receivers were making plays.”

UNI has some nice receivers, but they’re not Ohio State. They’re not Ted Ginn Jr. and Santonio Holmes.

The Hawkeyes know this. And that’s why the first team was out there late in the game, when everything but the final score was decided.

“Why take us out?” defensive end Kenny Iwebema said. “We didn’t do anything for them to take us out.”

Next week, they’ll need to be better. And they know it.