Sign up for our countdown email.

Iowa head football coach Kirk Ferentz has 143 wins under his belt at the University of Iowa, one away from the all-time record.

The Gazette will count down each win, as ranked by writer Marc Morehouse.

104

In retrospect, 2008 Indiana was a turnaround moment for late 2000s Iowa

Iowa 45, Indiana 9 | Oct. 11, 2008

Iowa's Jewel Hampton stretches for a touchdown against Indiana at Memorial Stadium in Bloomington, Ind., on Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008. (The Gazette)
Iowa's Jewel Hampton stretches for a touchdown against Indiana at Memorial Stadium in Bloomington, Ind., on Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008. (The Gazette)
/

Three cool things:

1. This was a hot game. It was like 100.

At the end, when teams were going through the handshake line or what not, then-freshman defensive tackle Mike Daniels passed out on the way to the locker room. It took some time to get him on his feet, but everything turned out OK.

Just a weird little detail. Daniels went on to big things not very long after that.

2. In 2008, it felt like the recipe for what turf is now — the rubber pellets and synthetic blades of grass — was still in the shop. The turf at Memorial Stadium for this game was an ice rink, like the pellets fused. RB Shonn Greene tweaked an ankle. It ended up being a minor deal.

Turf in all stadiums seems steady now. The recipe for fake maintenance-free football fields has been perfected as much as it can be. (As far as I know.)

3. In 2007, Iowa QBs were sacked 46 times. That’s a Kirk Ferentz-era high, as you might imagine.

The Hoosiers got down at Kinnick with nine sacks. A lot of those O-linemen returned for the 2008 game. Yes, they do look for motivation, especially when it’s obvious. The nine sacks from 2007 were exactly that.

“That was emphasized all week. It had to be,” sophomore tackle Bryan Bulaga said. “That can kill a team. Nine sacks a game? C’mon.”

Quote: “That’s our style of football. That’s Iowa football, that’s Big Ten football. You’ve got to pound if you want to win. We pounded it and pounded it and finally we were able to break through and score some points.” — guard Seth Olsen.

Hot take: Is the 2008 O-line the second best of the Ferentz era? You can’t beat 2002. The ’08 group produced a Doak Walker Award winner. Weigh in.

Note: Indiana has had six football coaches during Ferentz’s run — Cam Cameron, Gerry DiNardo, Terry Hoeppner, Bill Lynch, Kevin Wilson and Tom Allen. The Hawkeyes meet Allen for the first time on Oct. 13 at Bloomington.

Ferentz is 9-5 against Indiana. The Hawkeyes have won six of the last seven in the series.

Why No. 104? — I have perhaps undervalued this one. Yes, it was a 45-9 blowout, but the Hawkeyes were still trying to figure things out at this point in the season. They were 3-3 with three consecutive losses.

Maybe this was the turnaround. The 2008 Hawkeyes have a seat at the table for Ferentz’s best. KF has one nine-win team and this is it. (Weird aside: Hayden Fry only had three nine-win teams in 20 seasons. Nine wins seems to be a slippery mark for Iowa, like scoring 11 points in a football game.)

OK, this was the turnaround. This started a streak where the Hawkeyes won 15 of 16 games. That one loss was a thriller at Illinois.

Totally undervalued. We might have some of that in this.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE OF THE GAME

Game story from 2008

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Somewhere in the second half, it was goat herding. It was probably this series, the one when true freshman running back Jewel Hampton ran nine times for 63 yards and scored on a 10 yard run in the third quarter. If you want to pinpoint the exact moment Saturday ’s game turned into goat herding, that might be it.

But make no mistake, it was goat herding, with Iowa in the role of herder and Indiana obediently playing the goat.

Shonn Greene gutted out 115 yards and a touchdown on 23 carries after an ankle injury on his second attempt, and Hampton, playing in his home state, took over in the second half with 114 yards and three touchdowns to spur Iowa’s 45-9 victory.

The Hawkeyes (4-3, 1-2 Big Ten) snapped a three-game losing streak on the backs of their offensive line. Senior guard Seth Olsen wearily leaned up against a crimson wall at Memorial Stadium and smiled a mile wide.

Goat herding takes a lot out of you.

“That’s our style of football. That’s Iowa football, that’s Big Ten football,” Olsen said. “You’ve got to pound if you want to win. We pounded it and pounded it and finally we were able to break through and score some points.”

Iowa’s offensive line wanted to say something. All week it heard about last season’s Indiana game. You remember that one. The Hoosiers (2-4, 0-3) racked up nine sacks in a 38-20 victory at Kinnick Stadium.

Olsen claimed he read in a newspaper that one Indiana player said he was going to get five sacks against Iowa. IU’s defensive line put up four sacks against Minnesota last week.

The offensive linemen heard that nine-sack stat a few times last week. O-line coach Reese Morgan mentioned it, they said. Head coach Kirk Ferentz said he brought it up only once. The nine sacks were something the five offensive linemen used to pump themselves up.

Indiana had one sack Saturday.

“That was emphasized all week. It had to be,” sophomore tackle Bryan Bulaga said. “That can kill a team. Nine sacks a game? C’mon.”

Junior right tackle Kyle Calloway was switched to right tackle against the Hoosiers last season — his only game at the position last year — and struggled. Saturday, he played a sparkling clean game.

“At times when guys have to play before they’re ready, it’s not easy, especially up front,” Ferentz said. “There’s really no place to hide up there. The way we play, it ’s really tough to not be (found). It ’s part of the maturation process, but I don’t want to minimize how hard those guys have worked.”

This was the first time Iowa put up two 100-yard rushers since last season’s opener against Northern Illinois. Greene topped 100 yards for the seventh consecutive week, an Iowa first. His 937 yards are the most for an Iowa back through seven games since Tavian Banks had 1,125 in 1997.

“I felt like there was maybe a breaking point somewhere in the second half when we were able to start driving the ball with greater ease than we did in the first half,” Olsen said. “They were still playing and still fighting. They played to the very end, so I give them credit.”

That was more than Indiana Coach Bill Lynch gave to his team.

“In the second half, Iowa just totally dominated the game in every way possible,” he said. “They ran it at will. They threw it. They maintained possession. We didn’t do enough with it when we got the chance.”

The Hoosiers had some hope in the first half when quarterback Kellen Lewis was firing on all cylinders. The junior, who’s earned a career’s worth of helmet stickers against Iowa, directed an 11-play, 89-yard drive in the final two minutes of the first half to pull Indiana within 17-10 just before halftime.

But somewhere during that series, Lewis, who finished 13 of 18 for 108 yards, a TD and an interception, injured an ankle and didn’t return.

With backup Ben Chappell in the second half, the Hoosiers managed only 132 yards. The Hawkeyes had the ball for enough time to baste a turkey in the second half, lording a 21:26 to 8:34 advantage in time of possession.

Iowa outgained Indiana, 422 to 286. Iowa held IU to 95 yards on 29 carries. That allowed quarterback Ricky Stanzi a stadium-sized comfort zone to shake off the turnover troubles (five the last two weeks) that killed Iowa in its first two Big Ten games.

He played his best and most complete game Saturday, completing 12 of 20 for 184 yards and two TDs, a 34-yarder to Andy Brodell and a 20-yarder to Brandon Myers. Stanzi completed his first seven passes in the second half when Iowa scored on its first two possessions and took control. No turnovers, by the way.

“We put some points up on the board,” Stanzi said. “It was good to drive down the field and not be disappointed.”

That’s the goal, not being disappointed. They led the league in not being disappointed Saturday.