Prep Basketball

Shot clock will be in use at Iowa high school boys' basketball event in Cedar Rapids

Wells Fargo Advisors Shootout got approval from IHSAA, NFHS

A balls heads for the basket during the first half of a game between Waldorf and Mount Mercey at Hennessey Recreation Center in Cedar Rapids on Monday, December 17, 2018. (Cliff Jette/The Gazette)
A balls heads for the basket during the first half of a game between Waldorf and Mount Mercey at Hennessey Recreation Center in Cedar Rapids on Monday, December 17, 2018. (Cliff Jette/The Gazette)

If you want to see a shot clock implemented in Iowa high school basketball, Cedar Rapids is the place to be this winter.

The Wells Fargo Advisors Shootout — a two-day boys’ basketball event on Jan. 11 and Jan. 18 — announced Wednesday that the Iowa High School Athletic Association and National Federation of High Schools approved it to use a 35-second shot clock for its games.

“We feel this is a very important and historic date for the potential future of basketball in Iowa,” a statement from the WFA Shootout read. “The IHSAA and mainly their executive director Mr. Tom Keating were great to work with and did a very good job of helping us get this finalized.”

The Jan. 11 games will be hosted at Kohawk Arena on the campus of Coe College. Cedar Rapids Kennedy is the site for the Jan. 18 event.

Wells Fargo Advisors Shootout — Jan. 11 games

• Don Bosco vs. Alburnett

• Central City vs. Edgewood-Colesburg

• Iowa City Liberty vs. TBD

• Linn-Mar vs. West Des Moines Valley

• Cedar Rapids Xavier vs. Charles City

• Waterloo West vs. Iowa City High

• Cedar Rapids Kennedy vs. Lenexa St. James Academy (Kan.)

Wells Fargo Advisors Shootout — Jan. 18 games (more TBA)

• Springville vs. Central City

• West Branch vs. Camanche

• Cedar Rapids Jefferson vs. TBD

• Cedar Rapids Kennedy vs. Davenport West

The WFA Shootout joins Rivalry Saturday — a one-day girls’ basketball event Nov. 30 at Kohawk Arena — in using a shot clock on an experimental basis this season.

In a Gazette report last winter, Todd Tharp, assistant director for the Iowa High School Athletic Association, said there would be consequences for Iowa joining the shot-clock club on a full-time basis.

“Our handbook states that we are required to follow the rules of the National Federation (of High Schools), as far as each sport is concerned,” he said. “Unless it is mandated by the NFHS, we wouldn’t make an adaptation to our playing rules.”

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADVERTISEMENT

Any state that makes an adaptation, Tharp said, loses its national voting rights on rules with the NFHS.

In a Gazette poll conducted for that story, 33 of 47 responding area coaches said they “strongly” or “moderately” supported a shot clock for high school basketball. Four were “indifferent,” and 10 “strongly” or “moderately” opposed a clock.

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.