Iowa Football

Iowa 2019 depth chart projections: Quarterback, wide receiver, offensive tackle are the strengths

Sorting out running backs, finding tight ends and solidifying the interior OL are what's ahead

Iowa quarterback Nate Stanley takes a selfie with a fan after the Outback Bowl at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Fla., on Jan. 1, 2019. (Douglas DeFelice/USA TODAY Sports)
Iowa quarterback Nate Stanley takes a selfie with a fan after the Outback Bowl at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Fla., on Jan. 1, 2019. (Douglas DeFelice/USA TODAY Sports)
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IOWA CITY — So, lightning struck twice at the Iowa tight end position.

The first bolt was the 2018 season for T.J. Hockenson and Noah Fant. Hockenson won the Mackey Award as the nation’s top tight end. He’s the second Hawkeye to pull that down, joining one Dallas Clark. Fant added another seven touchdowns to his Iowa tight end record for TD receptions (19 TDs in three seasons).

The second strike carried both tight ends to the NFL.

Hockenson departed with two seasons of eligibility left. Fant passed on his senior year. Add their departures to wide receiver Nick Easley’s graduation and that’s a lot of lost production in the passing game.

Everyone hates the “losing such and such percentage of production” posts, but it is that time of year, so ...

Hockenson, Fant and Easley combined for 140 receptions last season (57.8 percent of Iowa’s 242 receptions). Their 1,773 yards were 60.1 percent of Iowa’s receiving yards (2,946). And their 18 TDs accounted for 66.6 percent of Iowa’s receiving TDs (27).

So, there’s work to do for an offense that put points on the board last season, averaging 31.2 points a game, the third most in head coach Kirk Ferentz’s 20 seasons.

» Iowa 2019 depth chart projections: Defense

Of course, senior quarterback Nate Stanley returns. He’s got numbers. He’s passed for 26 TDs in each of his two seasons as starter, the most in a two-year span in Iowa history. His 52 career TD passes are fourth at Iowa. His 5,240 yards total offense is ninth all time at Iowa.

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Stanley had costly lapses in 2018, mainly the second half against Penn State. He can spiral quickly on decision making, but there’s also this: Stanley has QB’d Iowa to 17 wins. Yes, wins are a team number and not just the QB, but QB has a say in, you know, winning.

Ricky Stanzi led Iowa to 26 victories from 2008-10. Stanley has a chance to be in that neighborhood.

For that to happen, those receiving percentages will have to fill in and the Hawkeyes will need more consistent success in the running game.

Stanley has shown he can make everyone around him better. Consistency will be key for Iowa offense 2019.

Quarterback

The starter — Nate Stanley (sr.): There’s line in the movie “There will be Blood” where the lead character Daniel Plainview (Oscar-winning performance by Daniel Day-Lewis) looks at the county land inspector, inquires about a property and gets a nonplused look from the guy, whose name is Al.

Day-Lewis’ character shoots back, “Don’t be thick in front of me, Al.”

That’s me to Stanley complaints. I’m not letting him off the hook. I thought QB coach Ken O’Keefe articulated Stanley’s deal in December.

“Really, the only time he got himself into trouble was when he tried to push through something that he wasn’t seeing quite right and maybe put a ball where he really didn’t want it to go,” O’Keefe said. “That’s the thing you’ve got to fight. You have to resist the urge to try to do something that you know isn’t quite correct and just keep moving on from there.”

That happened on a bad pick in the Outback Bowl. Stanley is as conscientious as they come. He still is a work in progress and one thing that’s struck me after going through a lot of the offensive numbers of the Kirk Ferentz era is the inconsistency. In 2017, Iowa passed for around 2,400 yards. Last year, it was more than 2,900. Those swings, I can see where that would drive you nuts.

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Don’t even with the regression stuff. It’s variability for Iowa’s offense, Iowa’s entire offense. That’s a very real thing.

 

Next — It’s probably a transfer spring for someone. It’s OK, QBs transfer. Let’s allow spring to play out before we guess who. Redshirt freshman Spencer Petras and sophomore Peyton Mansell are the contenders, with Alex Padilla playing the role of true freshman who’ll probably be taking snaps from under center for the first time.

Petras has pedigree. Mansell is the closest Iowa has to a runner at QB. We’ll see.

Running back

The starter — Mekhi Sargent (jr.): Sargent was a late signee from Iowa Western last year. So, he had the most to prove and zero time to do it after coming in during the summer. It took time for Sargent (5-10, 210) to figure out the refined reads in Iowa’s running game, but that seemed to hit in November, when he rushed for 360 yards (11th in the Big Ten for the month of November), averaged 5.71 yards per carry and scored five TDs (tied for second most in the Big Ten in that span).

Sargent doesn’t have the Akrum Wadley gear, but he can move through traffic. That was one thing offensive coordinator Brian Ferentz mentioned as important for running backs last summer.

 

Next — This is a little like fishing. You catch an 18-inch walleye, but you keep fishing. You catch a 20-inch walleye, the 18-incher goes back in the lake.

Iowa has six scholarship running backs for 2019, with a pair of incoming freshmen in Tyler Goodson and Shadrick Byrd.

Junior Ivory Kelly-Martin won the job out of camp last year. After a series of injuries last season, Kelly-Martin has to be hungry to show what he can do.

Fullback

The starter — Brady Ross (sr.): Odd fact: Ross only had one start last season. With Scrooge McDuckian riches at tight end in 2018, the extra TE got the start after week 1. Ross returned for the Outback Bowl and played just three snaps.

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The fullback isn’t going away and could see more snaps in 2019 with tight end in a massive transition.

 

Next — Sophomore Joe Ludwig is probably FB2. The 6-0, 233-pounder saw some action last season. I like that Iowa uses two fullbacks. It takes some of the load off a definite collision position. Fullbacks are relied on to set a physical pace in practice. The tandem approach is smart.

Left tackle

The starter — Alaric Jackson (jr.): The 6-7, 320-pounder gave up maybe two sacks during a season in which he earned second-team all-Big Ten on the coaches ballot. Jackson ended 2017 on suspension and began 2018 on suspension, but after missing the first week, it was all football.

Jackson has extremely quick feet and NFL size. After 2019, he’ll be a three-year starter at left tackle for Iowa. Yes, he’ll probably have a chance to make an early leap to the NFL.

 

Next — Sophomore Mark Kallenberger (6-6, 282) is one of the Hawkeyes’ most intriguing reserves. If he can make a push for the top five and maybe give OL coach Tim Polasek something to think about as far as the starting lineup, well, that’d be a really great problem for Iowa. Kallenberger is probably getting pretty close to that.

Left guard

The starter — Cole Banwart (jr.): The 6-4, 296-pounder lined up across from Mississippi State defensive tackle Jeffery Simmons in the Outback Bowl. Simmons will be a top-10 pick in April. So, don’t hold too much of the Outback Bowl against any Iowa offensive lineman. Simmons was an avalanche.

Banwart is a tough, no-nonsense classic Iowa offensive lineman from Iowa. His folks operate a trucking/hauling company in Ottosen. He doesn’t know what a silver spoon looks like. He’ll work.

 

Next — Senior Landan Paulsen will be one of the backup guards. Let’s put him here. He played more last season than he ever has. Injuries have been a factor in his career. He seems poised to contribute. Sophomore walk-on Kyler Schott (6-2, 290) will be in his third year. Redshirt freshman Jeff Jenkins could make a push and start seeing the depth chart.

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Center

The starter — Tyler Linderbaum (fr.): We don’t know everything that Kirk Ferentz knows. Obviously, he believes they’ll find a defensive tackle or two, either in recruiting or in Daviyon Nixon. Ferentz doesn’t gamble this way. Does he? No, he doesn’t.

He also doesn’t really have to justify moving Linderbaum (6-2, 270) from defensive tackle to center. He’s the head coach. He’s also a center geek, and he sees something in Linderbaum that screams “center” to him.

A potential four-year starter at center is worth the risk. Ferentz knows Iowa isn’t going anywhere if the defense gives up 175 rushing yards a game. If it goes that way, he’ll hear that question every week in 2019.

 

Next — Maybe Cody Ince. He’ll be a redshirt freshman this year. He’s 6-5, 260. I’m stuck on the 6-5 center model because of Bruce Nelson, who was an All-American for the Hawkeyes in 2002. He was 6-5, 285 and a second-round pick of the Carolina Panthers in 2003. I like the rangy center getting to the second level.

Right guard

The starter — Levi Paulsen (sr.): The 6-5, 305-pound senior has been the middle reliever on Iowa’s offensive line. He’s spot started at guard and tackle. His lone start in 2017 was at right tackle in the opener. After that, Paulsen was a regular rotator at right guard. This is the position where Iowa will rotate a guy.

Of everyone on Iowa’s OL, Paulsen probably knows best that nothing is going to be handed to him. He still has things to prove. There’s work ahead, and Paulsen knows that.

 

Next — Seemingly every cycle of OLs comes with a prodigy who bridges the gap of the now and the future. You could argue that Tristan Wirfs is one of those types. Maybe Ezra Miller rotates here. Yes, he’s just a true freshman, but he’s an early enrollee, he’s 6-6, 310 pounds and, after coming up in Class A football in Iowa (Ridge View High School, from Holstein), Miller did some camp tours to measure himself against competition. He came through that with confidence.

Maybe Miller gets time here before his eventual move to tackle.

Right tackle

The starter — Tristan Wirfs (jr.): Don’t remember any sacks or very many pressures coming from Wirfs’ side in 2018. The tackle job was something Wirfs was thrown into as a true freshman in 2017. He took ownership last season. During bowl prep, Wirfs said he wants to be a better run blocker, a sentiment O-line coach Tim Polasek expressed in December.

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“We’re waiting for him to kind of rip open a Superman suit,” Polasek said. “I don’t think he’s quite pushed it through and become the dominant guy that he can be in the run game. In pass pro, this guy is close to being a lockdown guy. In the run game, you’d like to see him click off the uncommon look a little more quickly.”

Polasek did mention that Wirfs challenged guard Ross Reynolds for the team lead in “knock downs.” (Hey, they keep track of that.)

 

Next — You started seeing true freshman Jack Plumb in games late last season at tackle. He’ll be a redshirt freshman this fall, but he probably won’t be on the clock. Kallenberger will be the third tackle. If it goes deeper, maybe Levi Paulsen slides out there. At 6-8, 250, Plumb’s body is a work-in-progress. He’ll be on the clock in 2020.

Tight end (inline)

The starter — Nate Wieting (sr.): Wieting has dutifully filled the inline “blocker guy” TE spot for the last two seasons. Iowa might not be able to afford specialized TE roles this year. Last year, with two All-American types at TE, sure, you can chop it up a bit. In 2019, the wide receivers will be the more experienced group and could take a bigger bite out of the targets.

 

Next — This is probably a stretch, but incoming freshman Logan Lee has played in a few all-star games. The Orion, Ill., native also is 6-5, 245. He has position flexibility. Ferentz was asked about that on Wednesday.

“We’ll tinker with that stuff a little bit and we’ll look at our incoming personnel and try to keep an open mind in terms of how they can help us,” Ferentz said.

Tight end (flex)

The starter — Shaun Beyer (jr.): It’s going to be fun to watch Beyer put the punting incident against Wisconsin last season in the rearview mirror. Let’s not dwell much on that. Beyer was a 6-9 high jumper in high school. He’s a tremendous athlete with a 6-5, 245-pound frame. It’s his turn at tight end. He’s Iowa’s best athlete at the position. Beyer had bad timing with a leg injury that kept him out of December and the Outback Bowl.

“Shaun Beyer was doing a lot of really good things (before his injury),” offensive coordinator Brian Ferentz said. “We’re really excited about him. Unfortunately, we didn’t get the work but he’ll be back in January and we’ll get a chance to get going again.”

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Next — Senior Drew Cook should be ready to contribute after moving from QB during 2017 spring practice. The 6-5, 250-pounder is probably hungry to get on the field.

X wide receiver

The starter — Brandon Smith (jr.): If football math worked logically, Smith would once again multiply his increase in receptions by nine. As a true freshman, he caught three passes for 15 yards. Last year, it was 28 for 361 yards and two TDs. So, times nine, Smith is on the hook for 252 receptions in 2019.

It doesn’t work that way, of course. Sure, you can expect Smith’s numbers to climb, but it’s impossible to say what they might be. Iowa’s passing game has improved in Brian Ferentz’s two seasons as offensive coordinator, but there’s nothing automatic about the future.

Let’s forget stat projections and go with the fact that Smith is 6-3, 220-ish and will be one of Iowa’s more reliable targets in 2019. He made two SportsCenter Top 10 catches last season.

 

Next — Iowa likes big receivers at the split end position. They have zero resumes with the Hawkeyes, but redshirt freshman Calvin Lockett (6-2, 170) and true freshman Desmond Hutson (6-3, 185) have some length and could find themselves backing up Smith in 2019.

Z wide receiver

The starter — Ihmir Smith-Marsette (jr.): Sort of like Smith, Smith-Marsette increased his production in 2018 (18 receptions for 187 yards and two TDs in 2017; 23 for 361 and three TDs last year). His talents on kick return were fully realized, with Smith-Marsette leading the Big Ten and earning Big Ten return specialist of the year.

Smith-Marsette is confident his speed will expand his role in Iowa’s offense. The next step for him is getting to the point where defenses point him out and worry about his speed.

 

Next — Lockett and Hutson could be the names. Maybe Max Cooper or Samson Evans could make some noise here.

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F wide receiver (slot)

The starter — Tyrone Tracy (fr.): The goal for Tracy in his first season was keeping his redshirt in place. The 6-0, 187-pounder saw action in four games, caught one pass and did keep the redshirt.

Now, it’s time to play ball.

Tracy is the front-runner, but only here in this post. Wide receivers coach Kelvin Copeland mentions Tracy and redshirt freshman Nico Ragaini when talking 2019 slot receiver.

It’s an important position. Little-known fact: The slot receiver has led Iowa in receptions for four consecutive seasons.

 

Next — Ragaini is very much in this. The 6-0, 191-pounder also kept his redshirt in 2018. It’s time to compete. I wouldn’t be surprised to see Tracy and Ragaini rotate until one emerges or continue to rotate because they’re thriving.

Cooper, a junior, has game experience as the slot. He did suffer an ACL tear against Wisconsin last September, but his experience might work for him against two relatively untested freshman.

Kicker

The starter — ???? (???): We just don’t know.

Junior Caleb Shudak ended up being listed as the No. 2 kicker behind Miguel Recinos last season. Keith Duncan, the kicker who conquered Michigan in 2016, is in the mix. Lucas Amaya is an incoming walk-on freshman who hit 8 of 11 field goals with a long of 44 last season for Muskego (Wis.) High School.

For what it’s worth, Duncan was a true freshman walk-on when he hit the game-winner over Michigan in ’16.

This job opening also could include kickoff duties.

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“There’s two jobs, really, that have opened up right now,” Ferentz said. “And just like the punter, the guys on campus have the first shot at it and best shot at it. But whoever joins our team, we’ve got until the end of August, really, to figure this whole thing out, so it will be an open competition.”

Kirk Ferentz offenses ranked

Rushing Totals

1. 2002 — 553 rushes for 2,784 yards (214.2)

2. 2015 — 568 for 2,544 (181.7)

3. 2008 — 515 for 2,435 (188.7)

4. 2013 — 557 for 2,339 (179.9)

5. 2003 — 535 for 2,241 (172.4)

6. 2016 — 502 for 2,234 (171.8)

7. 2014 — 514 for 2,120 (163.1)

8. 2001 — 488 for 2,104 (175.3)

9. 2005 — 436 for 2,096 (174.7)

10. (tie) 2010 — 449 for 1,929 (148.4)

2018 — 488 for 1,929 (148.4)

12. 2006 — 432 for 1,865 (143.5)

13. 2017 — 481 for 1,810 (139.2)

14. 2011 — 454 for 1,790 (137.7)

15. 2007 — 438 for 1,515 (126.2)

16. 2009 — 454 for 1,485 (114.2)

17. 2012 — 404 for 1,476 (123.0)

18. 2000 — 403 for 1,090 (90.8)

19. 1999 — 339 for 1.028 (93.5)

20. 2004 — 428 for 871 (72.6)

 

Ranking Kirk Ferentz Runners

(Best seasons in Kirk Ferentz era)

1. Shonn Greene 307 carries for 1,850 yards, 20 TDs (2008)

2. Marcus Coker 281 carries for 1,384 yards, 15 TDs (2011)

3. Fred Russell 282 carries for 1,355 yards, 7 TDs (2003)

4. Albert Young 249 carries for 1,334 yards, 8 TDs (2005)

5. Russell 220 carries for 1,264 yards, 9 TDs (2002)

6. Akrum Wadley 252 carries for 1,109 yards, 10 TDs (2017)

7. Ladell Betts 232 carries for 1,090 yards, 5 TDs (2000)

8. Akrum Wadley 168 carries for 1,081 yards, 10 TDs (2016)

9. Betts 222 carries for 1,060 yards, 10 TDs (2001)

10. LeShun Daniels 213 carries for 1,058 yards, 10 TDs (2016)

11. Jordan Canzeri 183 for 984 yards, 12 TDs (2015)

12. Mark Weisman 226 carries for 974 yards, 8 TDs (2013)

13. Young 206 carries for 968 yards, 6 TDs (2007)

14. Adam Robinson 203 carries for 941 yards, 10 TDs (2010)

15. Betts 189 carries for 857 yards, 5 TDs (1999)

16. Robinson 181 carries for 834 yards, 5 TDs (2009)

17. Weisman 159 carries for 815 yards, 8 TDs (2012)

18. Young 178 carries for 779 yards, 7 TDs (2006)

19. Mekhi Sargent 159 carries for 745 yards (2018)

20. Jermelle Lewis 123 carries for 709 yards, 8 TDs (2002)

 

Passing Totals

1. 2006 — 248 of 423 for 3,118 yards (58.6 completion percentage, 21 TDs, 19 INTs)

2. 2005 — 245 of 404 for 3,093 yards (60.6%, 23 TDs, 8 INTs)

3. 2014 — 265 of 437 for 3,081 yards (60.6%, 21 TDs, 7 INTs)

4. 2011 — 240 of 412 for 3,052 yards (58.3%, 25 TDs, 8 INTs)

5. 2010 — 226 of 357 for 3,049 yards (63.3%, 26 TDs, 6 INTs)

6. 2018 — 242 of 408 for 2,946 yards (59.3%, 27 TDs, 11 INTs)

7. 2009 — 213 of 392 for 2,887 yards (54.3%, 19 TDs, 20 INTs)

8. 2004 — 239 of 385 for 2,881 yards (62.1%, 20 TDs, 14 INTs)

9. 2015 — 227 of 369 for 2,862 yards (61.5%, 17 TDs, 5 INTs)

10. 2002 — 182 of 314 for 2,734 yards (57.9%, 27 TDs, 5 INTs)

11. 2001 — 210 of 323 for 2,618 yards (65.0%, 20 TDs, 13 INTs)

12. 2000 — 230 of 404 for 2,580 yards (56.9%, 16 TDs, 11 INTs)

13. 2013 — 213 of 375 for 2,562 yards (56.8%, 19 TDs, 15 INTs)

14. 2017 — 199 of 355 for 2,473 yards (56.1%, 27 TDs, 6 INTs)

15. 2008 — 187 of 320 for 2,362 yards (58.4%, 16 TDs, 11 INTs)

16. 2007 — 199 of 376 for 2,281 yards (52.9%, 17 TDs, 7 INTs)

17. 1999 — 202 of 376 for 2,275 yards (53.7%, 6 TDs, 9 INTs)

18. 2012 — 223 of 389 for 2,249 yards (57.3%, 7 TDs, 8 INTs)

19. 2003 — 171 of 320 for 2,095 yards (53.4%, 19 TDs, 10 INTs)

20. 2016 — 175 of 310 for 1,991 yards (56.6%, 17 TDs, 10 INTs)

 

Kirk Ferentz QB numbers

2018 — Nate Stanley 235 of 396 for 2,852 yards, 59.3, 26 TDs, 10 INTs, 136.46 efficiency

2017 — Nate Stanley 196 of 351 for 2,437 yards, 55.8, 26 TDs, 6 INTs, 135.18 efficiency

2016 — C.J. Beathard 170 of 301 for 1,929 yards, 56.5, 17 TDs, 10 INTs, 122.32 efficiency

2015 — C.J. Beathard 223 of 362 for 2,809 yards, 61.6, 17 TDs, 5 INTs, 139.52 efficiency

2014 — Jake Rudock 213 of 345 for 2436 yards, 61.7, 16 TDs, 5 INTs, 133.46 efficiency

2013 — Jake Rudock 204 of 346 for 2,383 yards, 59 percent completions, 18 TDs, 13 INTs, 126.47 efficiency

2012 — James Vandenberg 223 of 389 for 2,249 yards, 57.3 percent completions, 7 TDs, 8 INTs, 107.72 efficiency

2011 — James Vandenberg 237 of 404 for 3,022 yards, 58.7 percent completions, 25 TDs, 7 INTs, 138.44 efficiency

2010 — Ricky Stanzi 221 of 345 for 3,004 yards, 64.1 percent completions, 25 TDs, 6 INTs, 157.63 efficiency

2009 — Ricky Stanzi 171 of 304 for 2,417 yards, 56.3 percent completions, 15 TDs, 15 INTs, 131.62 efficiency

2008 — Ricky Stanzi 150 of 254 for 1,956 yards, 59.1 percent completions, 14 TDs, 9 INTs, 134.35 efficiency

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2007 — Jake Christensen 198 of 370 for 2,269 yards, 53.5 percent completions, 17 TDs, 6 INTs, 116.94 efficiency

2006 — Drew Tate 207 of 352 for 2,623 yards, 58.8 percent completions, 18 TDs, 13 INTs, 130.89 efficiency

2005 — Drew Tate 219 of 352 for 2,828 yards, 62.2 percent completions, 22 TDs, 7 INTs, 146.35 efficiency

2004 — Drew Tate 233 of 375 for 2,786 yards, 62.1 percent completions, 20 TDs, 14 INTs, 134.67 efficiency

2003 — Nathan Chandler 165 of 307 for 2,040 yards, 53.7 percent completions, 18 TDs, 10 INTs, 122.40 efficiency

2002 — Brad Banks 170 of 294 for 2,575 yards, 57.8 percent completions, 26 TDs, 5 INTs, 157.12 efficiency

2001 — Kyle McCann 167 of 252 for 2,028 yards, 66.3 percent completions, 16 TDs, 11 INTs, 146.09 efficiency

2000 — Trio II 230 of 404 for 2,580 yards, 56.9 percent completions, 16 TDs, 11 INTs, 118.20 efficiency

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1999 — Trio I 202 of 376 for 2,275 yards, 53.7 percent completions, 6 TDs, 9 INTs, 105.03 efficiency

Trio I — Kyle McCann, Randy Reiners, Scott Mullen

Trio II — McCann, Mullen, Jon Beutjer

 

Total offense

1. 2002 — 5,518 yards of offense (6.4 yards per play, 424.5 yards per game)

2. 2015 — 5,406 yards (5.77 per play, 386.1 per game)

3. 2014 — 5,201 yards (5.47 per play, 400.1 per game)

4. 2005 — 5,189 yards (6.2 per play, 432.4 per game)

5. 2015 — 4,983 yards (5.8 per play, 383.3 per game)

6. 2010 — 4,978 yards (6.18 per play, 382.9 per game)

7. 2013 — 4,900 yards (5.26 per play, 376.9 per game)

8. 2018 — 4,875 yards (5.44 per play, 375.0 per game)

9. 2011 — 4,842 yards (5.60 per play, 372.5 per game)

10. 2008 — 4,815 yards (5.8 per play, 370.4 per game)

11. 2001 — 4,722 yards (5.8 per play, 393.5 per game)

12. 2009 — 4,372 yards (5.17 per play, 336.3 per game)

13. 2003 — 4,336 yards (5.1 per play, 333.5 per game)

14. 2017 — 4,283 yards (5.12 per play, 329.5 per game)

15. 2016 — 4,225 yards (5.20 per play, 325.0 per game)

16. 2007 — 3,796 yards (4.7 per play, 316.3 per game)

17. 2004 — 3,752 yards (4.6 per play, 312.7 per game)

18. 2012 — 3,725 yards (4.70 per play, 310.4 per game)

19. 2000 — 3,670 yards (4.5 per play, 305.8 per game)

20. 1999 — 3,303 yards (4.6 per play, 300.3 per game)

 

Ranking Kirk Ferentz receivers

(Yards in a season)

1. Marvin McNutt 1,315 yards, 12 TDs (2011)

2. Kevin Kasper 1,010 yards, 7 TDs (2000)

3. Maurice Brown 966 yards, 11 TDs (2002)

4. Clinton Solomon 905 yards, 6 TDs (2004)

5. McNutt 861 yards, 8 TDs (2010)

6. Kahlil Hill 841 yards, 8 TDs (2001)

7. Solomon 800 yards, 7 TDs (2005)

8. T.J. Hockenson 760 yards, 6 TDs (2018)

9. Derrell Johnson-Koulianos 750 yards, 2 TDs (2009)

10. Johnson-Koulianos 745 yards, 10 TDs (2010)

11. Ed Hinkel 744 yards, 7 TDs (2004)

12. Dallas Clark 742 yards, 4 TDs (2002)

13. Andy Brodell 724 yards, 5 TDs (2006)

14. Keenan Davis 713 yards, 4 TDs (2011)

15. Matt VandeBerg 703 yards, 4 TDs (2015)

16. McNutt 674 yards, 8 TDs (2009)

17. Kasper 664 yards, 3 TDs (1999)

18. Dominique Douglas 654 yards, 2 TDs (2006)

19. Johnson-Koulianos 639 yards, 3 TDs (2008)

20. Hill 619 yards, 5 TDs (2000)

 

Kirk Ferentz era receptions (season)

1. (tie) Marvin McNutt (2011) 82

Kevin Kasper (2000)

3. Matt VandeBerg (2015) 65

4. Ed Hinkel (2004) 63

5. Kasper (1999) 60

6. Kahlil Hill (2001) 59

7. (tie) Hill (2000) 58

Clinton Solomon (2004)

9. McNutt (2010) 53

10. Nick Easley (2018) 52

11. Easley (2017) 51

12. Keenan Davis (2011) 50

13. (tie) Dominique Douglas (2006) 49

T.J. Hockenson (2018)

15. Maurice Brown (2002) 48

16. (tie) Derrell Johnson-Koulianos (2010) 46

Solomon (2005)

18. Johnson-Koulianos (2009) 45

19. Johnson-Koulianos (2008) 44

20. Tevaun Smith (2014) 43

 

Scoring offense

1. 2002 — 37.2 points per game (60 TDs, 21 FGs)

2. 2001 — 32.6 points per game (51 TDs, 12 FGs)

3. 2018 — 31.2 points per game (50 TDs, 17 FGs)

4. 2015 — 30.9 points per game (56 TDs, 16 FGs)

5. 2008 — 30.3 points per game (46 TDs, 19 FGs)

6. 2005 — 30.0 points per game (42 TDs, 17 FGs)

7. 2010 — 28.9 points per game (48 TDs, 14 FGs)

8. 2003 — 28.7 points per game (39 TDs, 20 FGs)

9. 2014 — 28.2 points per game (47 TDs, 12 FGs)

10. (tie) 2002 — 37.2 points per game (60 TDs, 21 FGs)

2017 — 28.2 (48 TDs, 11 FGs)

12. 2013 — 26.3 points per game (42 TDs, 16 FGs)

13. 2016 — 24.9 points per game (42 TDs, 10 FGs)

14. 2004 — 24.3 points per game (30 TDs, 21 FGs)

15. 2006 — 23.8 points per game (37 TDs, 15 FGs)

16. 2009 — 23.2 points per game (35 TDs, 19 FGs)

17. 2012 — 19.3 points per game (26 TDs, 17 FGs)

18. 2007 — 18.5 points per game (28 TDs, 10 FGs)

19. 2000 — 16.9 points per game (23 TDs, 14 FGs)

20. 1999 — 14.7 points per game (20 TDs, 7 FGs)

l Comments: (319) 398-8256; marc.morehouse@thegazette.com

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