Small College Sports

Brent Lammers makes impact for Upper Iowa and alma mater West Delaware

Senior QB helped lead Peacocks to win over No. 11 Winona State, worked with kids during summer

Brent Lammers tries to put some distance between himself and a defender. (Zach Lefebure)
Brent Lammers tries to put some distance between himself and a defender. (Zach Lefebure)
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FAYETTE — Upper Iowa’s Brent Lammers understands the impact college players can have on younger athletes.

As a West Delaware prep, he aspired to be like the Hawk quarterbacks before he filled the position and the impact they had when they would return for summer workouts.

So, Lammers didn’t hesitate to reverse roles, attending the Hawks Sunday night minicamps during the summer.

“I would go up there and help any way I could,” said Lammers, an all-state QB for West Delaware Coach Doug Winkowitsch. “Any little details quarterbacks needed help on or what Wink wanted me to work on, whether it was throwing mechanics or footwork, I was there to help.

“I had a lot of fun doing that. I liked interacting with the high schoolers. Seeing how much they love the game really drove me to get back to Fayette and get ready for the season.”

Lammers returned to Upper Iowa and resumed his role as the starting quarterback. He is coming off an impressive performance, accounting for 330 of the Peacocks’ 401 total offensive yards in a 34-33 home victory over then-No. 11 ranked Winona State (Minn.). Upper Iowa (1-2) faces Southwest Minnesota State in Marshall, Minn., Saturday at 1 p.m.

“It is always nice to get the first win out of the way, but we have to start building off it,” Lammers said. “It was a great feeling. We have another good team.”

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The 6-foot, 205-pounder did a little bit of everything in the come-from-behind upset. Lammers threw for 269 yards and three touchdowns, including two of those scores in the fourth quarter to keep the Peacocks within a score of the Warriors.

He also added 39 yards on the ground and made his first career reception, which was a 22-yard 4th-and-10 conversion on the game-winning drive.

“I’m going to do whatever I can to help the team get a win,” said Lammers, who praised a young offensive line. “If that’s running the ball 50 times, throwing it 50 times or if I need to catch it here or there. Whatever the coaches think is best.

“We’ve got a lot of weapons at receiver. We’ve got some young guys, who are playmakers. The running backs can hit you in the mouth or run past you. Having all these weapons around me makes me look better than what I actually am.”

The lesson is a good one to pass on to younger players and those younger Hawks would be wise to take note. Winkowitsch knows Lammers’ mettle very well from his time as a three-year starter, amassing 6,402 total yards and 71 TDs for the Hawks.

“Having his leadership and mindset around our guys was and is priceless,” Winkowitsch said about the offseason workouts. “Brent is one of the toughest guys we’ve ever coached, it’s contagious. We truly appreciate him and what he stands for.”

Lammers appreciated his opportunity to pay it forward and said he enjoyed seeing the younger players’ growth and passion for the game. He recalled when former Hawks quarterback and Minnesota Twins draft pick B.J. Hermsen came back to work, or even joke, with high school players.

“Just looking back on it that was huge for us seeing how much the program meant to him and be able to come back,” said Lammers, noting he would like to be a football and wrestling coach in the future. “Some of these kids might be looking up to some other college athlete me being there and maybe not working with that specific kid but showing him how much that program meant to me when I was in high school hopefully it meant the same to them.”

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Much of his offseason time was devoted to his own progress. Lammers played in 10 games as a junior, throwing for 1,916 yards and one more interception than his 12 TDs and entered the season with 3,418 career passing yards and 20 scores in his first three seasons.

Lammers has thrown for 930 yards with eight scores and has improved his TD-to-interception ratio (8 to 4) through the first three games. Watching more film has allowed him to understand the offense and defense better.

“It’s more mental than anything,” Lammers said. “It was actually a blessing to play a couple games my freshman and sophomore year just to get me ready for last year and this year. It really slowed down the game and I know what to do out there.”

l Comments: (319) 368-8679; kj.pilcher@thegazette.com

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