Letters to the Editor

Too much depressing, indigestible news

The Nov. 21 edition of The Gazette was par for the course in exposing the degradation of our civic life and institutions.

University of Iowa fraternities are again in the news for a variety of outrages (alcohol, hazing). During my four years, I never understood the appeal of fraternities, which seemed then (as now) geared to keeping impressionable young men insulated from contact with anyone different from themselves. By now it should be apparent that fraternities are not just adjuncts to university life but are antithetical to its very goals and purposes. Why are they tolerated?

Then, turning to Washington, the paper cast some light on the rise from rags to riches of President Donald Trump’s Acting Attorney General, Matthew Whitaker. Last year he received $55,000 a month — and over three years, $1,219,000 — as the head of a phantom foundation supported by dark, untraceable money. He headed an organization that “only existed on paper and didn’t do anything.” Good work if you can get it.

Several months ago I canceled my online subscription to The New York Times. When the pleasant subscription lady asked what the reason was, I answered, “Too much news, too much depressing, indigestible news.” I fear The Gazette may be pushing me into the same corner. But it’s not our sources of news that are at fault. And do we really need to try so hard to “make America great again?” It would surely be enough if America were only good.

Harvey Sollberger

Strawberry Point

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