Letters to the Editor

Support wildlife rehab Cedar Rapids

I could not agree more with Todd Dorman in his support of state licensed wildlife rehabber Amber Oldfield who is under scrutiny by the city of Cedar Rapids for zoning issues in her quest to save Iowa’s wildlife. This also happened to Rachelle Hanson, another licensed rehabber who lives in the Worthington Acres area of Cedar Rapids. The city need not be punitive toward Amber, but instead empathetic and appreciative for what Iowa’s state and federally licensed wildlife rehabbers actually do. Rehabilitating Iowa’s indigenous wildlife is a temporary thing. The animals are nurtured, returned to health and released to their natural environment. Some survive their injuries, others are humanely euthanized. Most of these wild animals are babies with the largest influx occurring in spring and summer. The vast majority of wildlife calls for assistance come from the public. Businesses, neighborhoods, kids on a playground.

Caring for these animals is entirely paid for out of their own pockets. This is no different then what our many local dog and cat rescues and shelters do through their network of foster homes. Cedar Rapids needs to view in-city wildlife rehabbers as serving the interest of the public and Iowa’s wildlife.

Come on C.R., do the right thing and find a humane way to make this work.

Jan Erceg

Solon

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