Letters to the Editor

Research and reconsider what's placed on your lawn

The poisons that kill violets, clovers and dandelions also effect soil microbes, kill earthworms, are ingested by squirrels, birds, pets, deer, bees, fish, and other wildlife, and can be found in our drinking water. In people they can cause cancer, nerve damage, and endocrine and reproductive disorders. And those most susceptible are children.

Studies found our brains are vulnerable to these chemicals, especially during fetal and early childhood development, and exposure to garden chemicals increases the risk of childhood leukemia sevenfold.

Despite “24-hour” signage, these poisons can be found on lawns for up to two months. One study found a week after lawn treatment, chemicals could be detected on all indoor air surfaces, including tabletops and windowsill. Indoor exposure to these toxins for children was about 10 times higher during the week after lawn chemical application than the week before.

Lawn spray advertisements including happy dogs or babies on treated lawns are cynical, and regulation and oversight of the chemical industry is poor.

There are many books on the subject and better solutions to minding our grounds, as well as information on websites like Rachel Carson Council, Beyond Pesticides, and others. Protect your family, the neighborhood, and our wildlife by saying no to a chemical lawn.

Brandon Ross

Iowa City

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.