Public Safety

Samoyed breeder charged with neglect can't have animals back, judge rules

Officials executed a search warrant Monday, Nov. 12, 2018, on a puppy mill in Worth County. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, said many of the dogs were kept in dirty and crowded conditions. (Photo supplied by ASPCA)
Officials executed a search warrant Monday, Nov. 12, 2018, on a puppy mill in Worth County. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, said many of the dogs were kept in dirty and crowded conditions. (Photo supplied by ASPCA)
/

NORTHWOOD — Animals seized from a north Iowa commercial puppy breeder will not be returned to their former owner, a Worth County judge ruled Monday.

Barbara Kavars, 65, of Manly, asked the Worth County Magistrate Court to allow her to keep 13 animals — nine Samoyeds and four house cats — of the 154 animals seized in November by the Worth County Sheriff’s Office and American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Worth County Magistrate Douglas Krull ruled Monday that the 13 animals requested are deemed “threatened animals” and will not be returned to Kavars.

“The court concludes that overall, and specifically to the 13 animals at issue, the evidence of neglect as defined by the Code of Iowa is overwhelming,” Krull said in court documents. “Kavars either is being untruthful regarding the condition and her care of the animals, or she does not comprehend the actual conditions which were in existence at the kennel and the status of the dogs and pups in her care.”

Kavars has not been charged.

One of the dogs Kavars wants to keep is pregnant, according to court documents.

“If we were to reward back a dog that is pregnant, we will be back in this situation next year,” ASPCA veterinarian Dr. Elizabeth Pearlman said during her testimony Monday.

At the time of the animals’ seizure, Kavars told Worth County deputies she wanted to continue breeding and would like at least two female dogs back.

Krull noted that Kavars failed to provide sufficient food and water, and did provide adequate shelter or take appropriate measures to stop the animals from fighting, which resulted in the death of at least one animal.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADVERTISEMENT

“Animals were confined, injured because of the confinement, and left in horrid, filthy conditions,” Krull said.

Kavars has 20 days to appeal the ruling.

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.

CONTINUE READING

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.