Public Safety

Former Cedar Rapids man convicted in Latasha Roundtree slaying is back in jail on assault, gun charges in Minnesota

Yasin Muhidin testifies July 22, 2014, in the first-degree murder trial of Tajh Ross in Linn County District Court in Ce
Yasin Muhidin testifies July 22, 2014, in the first-degree murder trial of Tajh Ross in Linn County District Court in Cedar Rapids. Muhidin was sentenced to 10 years in prison for his role in the 2012 shooting death of Latasha Roundtree, 18, in Cedar Rapids. Muhidin, now 24 and living in Rochester, Minn., was arrested June 3 in Rochester and charged with two felonies after an encounter at a campground. His arrest was videotaped by people yelling at police and questioning them about their use of guns in Muhidin’s arrest. (Liz Martin/The Gazette)

A Minnesota man who was convicted of manslaughter in the fatal shooting of Latasha Roundtree in 2012 is back in jail, accused of assaulting a man and threatening him with a gun at a Minnesota campground.

Yasin Nasir Muhidin’s arrest in Rochester drew protesters and videos when police, with guns drawn, stopped his vehicle.

Muhidin, 24, of Rochester, formerly of Cedar Rapids, was charged June 3 in Wabasha County District Court with second-degree assault and terroristic threats-replica firearm, both felonies, and fifth-degree assault, a misdemeanor.

In 2014, Muhidin pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter and trafficking stolen weapons in Roundtree’s slaying Sept. 22, 2012.

Roundtree, 19, a former Washington High basketball player, was shot while sitting in a car with two friends as they arrived at a house party being attended by Muhidin and four others charged in the case.

Roundtree wasn’t the intended target, but she was the only victim. She died from a gunshot wound to the head.

Muhidin, then 18, admitted during the pleading to aiding and abetting by going armed with intent. He drove the car with guns in the trunk to the party that night.

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Muhidin was sentenced to 10 years in prison. He also was convicted in a separate case for sexually assaulting a 14-year-old girl that same year. That 10-year sentence was ran concurrently to the 10 years in the Roundtree slaying.

Muhidin, along with four others, agreed to testify against Tajh Ross, 20, who was convicted of first-degree murder in Roundtree’s death and is serving life in prison without parole.

Muhidin was paroled in 2017 after serving about three years, according the Iowa Department of Corrections.

The Wabasha County, Minn., complaint states deputies responded to Mac’s Park Place Campground where a man with his grandson had asked Muhidin if he had paid to fish in that area and Muhidin said he didn’t need to pay.

Muhidin then punched the man in the jaw, went back to his vehicle and came back and pointed a silver “semi-automatic” gun at the man, according to the complaint. The man said he put his hands in the air and told Muhidin he didn’t need to shoot.

A female with Muhidin convinced him not to shoot, the man told authorities. Muhidin and “the girl” got back in the vehicle and left.

Deputies found a silver airsoft handgun they believe was thrown from the suspect’s vehicle, according to the complaint.

Rochester police later spotted and stopped Muhidin’s vehicle with their guns drawn, according to the Rochester Post Bulletin.

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Muhidin and three others in the vehicle were taken to the police department, but only Muhidin was arrested.

The police response drew a crowd of bystanders and caused an outcry on social media, in light of protests over racial injustice and calls for police reform, according to media reports.

Rochester police, in a statement, said high-risk stops are used to ensure the safety of the suspects, the officers and people in the area where the traffic stop happened.

Multiple videos of the traffic stop were posted to social media, the Post-Bulletin reported. Bystanders were yelling at police and questioning them about the use of guns.

Comments: (319) 398-8318; trish.mehaffey@thegazette.com

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