Nation & World

U.S. says it has proof on deadly gas attack

Reuters

United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley (right) talks Friday with Russian Ambassador to the United Nations Vasily Nebenzya before the United Nations Security Council meeting on Syria at the U.N. headquarters in New York.
Reuters United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley (right) talks Friday with Russian Ambassador to the United Nations Vasily Nebenzya before the United Nations Security Council meeting on Syria at the U.N. headquarters in New York.

WASHINGTON/UNITED NATIONS — The United States on Friday blamed the Syrian government for a deadly chemical weapons attack this month and slammed Russia for failing to stop its ally, President Bashar al-Assad, as Western allies considered military strikes on Syria.

While the prospect of U.S.-led military action that could lead to confrontation with Russia hung over the Middle East, the White House accused Syria of carrying out a toxic gas assault on April 7 that killed dozens of people in Douma, near Damascus.

“We have a very high confidence that Syria was responsible and, once again, Russia’s failure to stop them and their continued (lack of action) on this front has been part of the problem,” White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said.

U.S. intelligence shows a Russian claim that the attack was faked was false, Sanders said.

“Our intelligence tells us otherwise. I can’t go beyond that,” Sanders told reporters.

The U.S. State Department said the United States has proof at “a very high level of confidence” that the Syrian government carried out the attack but still is working to identify the mix of chemicals used.

President Donald Trump warned on Wednesday that missiles “will be coming” in response to the Douma incident. Russia has told the United States and its allies not to carry out any military strike.

Chemical weapons experts for the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons arrived in Syria to investigate the suspected poison gas attack.

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The investigators, who are only mandated to determine if chemical weapons were used and not who used them, were expected to start their investigations into the Douma incident on Saturday, the Netherlands-based organization said.

Asked whether the United States was waiting for the OPCW’s report before it makes a decision on Syria, State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said, “We believe we know who is responsible for this. We know a chemical weapon was used.”

While Trump himself was silent on Syria on Friday, giving no further clues on whether American military action is imminent, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said Washington estimated that Assad’s forces had used chemical weapons at least 50 times during the seven-year-old Syrian conflict.

“Our president has not yet made a decision about possible action in Syria. But should the United States and our allies decide to act in Syria, it will be in defense of a principle on which we all agree,” Haley told the U.N. Security Council.

“All nations and all people will be harmed if we allow Assad to normalize the use of chemical weapons.”

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