Nation & World

Amazon in favor of facial-recognition regulations

'You have to be accountable for your actions'

Sun Sentinel/TNS

A Palm Beach Sheriff’s officer uses a facial recognition software tool to provide identity resolution on cold cases.
Sun Sentinel/TNS A Palm Beach Sheriff’s officer uses a facial recognition software tool to provide identity resolution on cold cases.

SEATTLE — Amazon.com has joined the ranks of other technology companies, including Microsoft and Google, in acknowledging the risks of facial-recognition software and calling on the federal government to impose national regulations on the technology.

Amazon Web Services CEO Andy Jassy told an interviewer Monday that he welcomed federal legislation limiting the misuse of cloud-based facial-recognition software, such as Amazon Rekognition, at Recode’s Code 2019 conference in Arizona.

“Whether it’s private-sector companies or our police forces, you have to be accountable for your actions and you have to be held responsible if you misuse it,” Jassy said.

Amazon Rekognition uses artificial intelligence to identify people’s faces in photos and videos. A coalition of 85 civil-liberty groups has criticized the company for selling the facial-surveillance technology to governments as a “new power to target and single out immigrants, religious minorities, and people of color in our communities,” as members wrote in a January letter to Amazon.

Studies also have shown that Rekognition has higher chances of misidentifying images of darker-skinned females than lighter skinned males.

Jassy’s announcement Monday reflected a February blog post by Amazon Web Services that acknowledged the potential for misuse of the technology.

He reiterated the company’s stance that law-enforcement customers should only use results of facial recognition searches in their decision-making process if there’s a 99 percent confidence score.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADVERTISEMENT

Amazon offers free training to law-enforcement customers, Jassy said Monday, adding that customers who misuse the technology will be barred from using the platform.

In the over two years that the cloud service has been available, there’s not been a report of misuse by law enforcement, said Jassy.

“I strongly believe that just because technology could be misused, doesn’t mean that we should ban it and condemn it.”

Google has taken a tougher stance on safeguarding the public from potential misuse of its facial-recognition technology.

In a December blog post, the search giant vowed not to sell its facial-recognition products until it develops policies to avoid harmful outcomes.

Jassy said Amazon plans to continue selling its technology to governments.

“If our government doesn’t have access to all of the most modern, sophisticated technology that the private sector has, we’re in trouble,” Jassy said.

During Amazon’s annual shareholder meeting last month, only 1.7 percent of shareholders supported a proposal urging the company to stop selling its facial-recognition technology to governments.

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.