The Gazette  

Want to know more about the candidates running for election in 2018? Want to know who you can vote for? We have more than 80 candidates who have provided answers to the important political questions you care about. We also have an easy search option to help you narrow down to only the candidates you can actually vote for.

Nation & World

Airlines memo says 'non-elites' can wait

American says other airlines have same policy

The tail sections of a newly designed American Airlines aircraft (L),  a US Airways aircraft (C) and a traditional American Airlines aircraft are lined up at Dallas-Ft Worth International Airport in this file photo from February 14, 2013. The U.S. Justice Department sued August 13, 2013 to block the merger of American Airlines’ parent company AMR Corp and US Airways Group Inc, saying the deal would hurt consumers by leading to higher fares and fees.   REUTERS/Mike Stone/Files
The tail sections of a newly designed American Airlines aircraft (L), a US Airways aircraft (C) and a traditional American Airlines aircraft are lined up at Dallas-Ft Worth International Airport in this file photo from February 14, 2013. The U.S. Justice Department sued August 13, 2013 to block the merger of American Airlines’ parent company AMR Corp and US Airways Group Inc, saying the deal would hurt consumers by leading to higher fares and fees. REUTERS/Mike Stone/Files

American Airlines is taking some heat after an internal memo leaked telling employees that their first priority during delays or cancellations should be to get elite passengers to their destinations — even if it means using a competing airline — but economy passengers shouldn’t get that option.

The Fort Worth, Texas-based airline said it issued the memo because the policy — which it described as similar to the rebooking stance of some other carriers — had not been made clear to airport staff and was being executed inconsistently.

“It’s important to note that it is the same policy as other airlines,” American Airlines spokesman Curtis Blessing said.

However, bloggers have complained that American’s move is more in line with discount carriers than with large airlines and further separates elite flyers from everyone else.

Most major airlines have “interline agreements,” which outline how much rival airlines will pay one another to fly a competitor’s passengers in the case of flight delays or cancellations.

To avoid writing a check to a competitor, an airline will rebook a passenger on a rival carrier only as a last option.

Discount carriers usually don’t have such agreements.

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.

CONTINUE READING

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.