CORONAVIRUS

Iowa reported more than 700 hospitalizations for COVID-19, another record high

Gov. Kim Reynolds listens to Czech Village real estate investor Mary Kay Novak McGrath speak during a tour of small busi
Gov. Kim Reynolds listens to Czech Village real estate investor Mary Kay Novak McGrath speak during a tour of small businesses in the Czech Village affected by the Aug. 10 derecho storm in Cedar Rapids on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020. (Andy Abeyta/The Gazette)

More than 700 Iowans are being treated for COVID-19 in hospitals across the state, the highest number seen in Iowa since the start of the pandemic.

According to data from the Iowa Department of Public Health, Iowa hospitals were treating 718 COVID-19 patients as of 11 a.m. Monday, setting a record for the eighth straight day.

At the same time, intensive care unit patients dropped from 164 to 156, while the number of patients on ventilators jumped from 53 to 57.

Linn County saw 47 coronavirus-related hospitalizations as of Saturday, the most recent data available — a record high for the county’s hospitals.

In the past 24 hours, the state has reported 1,485 new cases, bringing Iowa’s total number of cases to 131,733. Over a seven-day period, the state averaged 2,182 new cases a day, setting another record for the 10th day in a row.

Of the 4,142 test results run in the 24-hour period, 2,657 were negative or inconclusive. That means more than one-third of those tested — 35.85 percent — were confirmed to have the virus.

The state also reported 18 confirmed deaths as of 11 a.m. Monday in 15 counties, bringing Iowa’s death toll to 1,734.

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Dallas, Dubuque and Scott counties each reported two deaths in the past 24 hours, while Benton, Black Hawk, Cass, Cedar, Clinton, Delaware, Henry, Lee, Linn, Wapello, Wayne and Winnebago counties reported one death each.

The worsening numbers have again prompted closures in other parts of the country, including here in Iowa.

On Monday, the Anamosa Community School District announced it would be transitioning all in-person schooling to online Continuous Learning for the next two weeks due to the high positivity rate in Jones County.

A total of 611 positive cases have been recorded in Jones County since the start of the pandemic, according to data from the Iowa Department of Public Health, and its positivity rate sits at 17.2 percent, according to the school district. Anamosa’s positivity rate is 19.9 percent. “The Iowa Department of Education recommends transitioning to continuous learning when rates exceed 15 percent,” the school district said in a message to parents Monday. “Additionally, all athletics and extracurricular activities will be canceled during this time starting after school (Monday).”

The school district said online learning would continue until November 16.

Linn County added 173 cases in the past 24 hours — the highest number of new cases added to any county in the state — bringing the county’s total number of cases to 6,803. The county’s seven-day average is 182 — another record high — and its positivity rate is 32.89 percent.

Johnson County added 58 cases, bringing its total to 6,292. The county’s seven-day average is 63 and its positivity rate is 26.85 percent.

Story County added six positive cases in the past 24 hours, bringing its total number of cases to 4,257. The county’s seven-day average is 38 and its positivity rate is 15.79 percent.

Black Hawk County added 66 new COVID-19 cases as of 11 a.m. Monday, bringing its total to 6,495. The county’s seven-day average is 131 — a record high — and its positivity rate is 46.81 percent.

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The number of new cases among school-age children up to age 17 was 138, for a total of 11,759. The education occupation category added 78 cases in the period, for a total of 6,585.

The state also removed Danville Care Center in Des Moines County from its outbreak list. The center had been added to the list on Aug. 22.

Comments: (319) 398-8238; kat.russell@thegazette.com

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