CORONAVIRUS

Linn County coronavirus cases at highest 7-day average

Six additional deaths reported statewide

Medical workers perform coronavirus testing on people inside their vehicles at the Test Iowa coronavirus testing site at
Medical workers perform coronavirus testing on people inside their vehicles at the Test Iowa coronavirus testing site at the Kirkwood Community College Continuing Education Training Center in Cedar Rapids on Thursday, May 28, 2020. Those wishing to be tested are required to show a QR code in order to enter. (Rebecca F. Miller/The Gazette)
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In a 24-hour period ending at 11 a.m. Saturday, Linn County reported 45 new COVID-19 cases — the third day of 40-plus positive cases.

That brings the county’s seven-day rolling average to 35, the county’s highest since the first cases of the virus were reported in March, according to the Iowa Department of Public Health.

The rolling seven-day average is the average number of daily coronavirus cases reported over a period of seven days.

The state also confirmed six deaths in the past day, one each in Marshall, Story and Muscatine counties. Emmet County reported its first virus-related death, and two deaths were recorded in Jasper County. That brings the statewide death toll to 826.

In neighboring Johnson County, which saw a surge in cases testing positive in late June that prompted some local restaurants to close their doors again to in-person dining, new cases steadily have declined in the past month.

The rolling seven-day average peaked at 49 on June 30, and on Saturday that average was recorded at 18 new cases.

Statewide, in the 24-hour period ending 11 a.m. Saturday, the state Department of Public Health reported 628 new coronavirus cases, for a 10.49 percent positive rate and bringing the state’s total to 41,628.

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Iowa surpassed two milestones in the past two days — topping 40,000 total cases since March on Thursday and 41,000 cases on Friday. The state’s rolling seven-day average is 536 new cases.

Gov. Kim Reynolds on Friday extended requirements for social distancing and increased hygiene at bars, restaurants and other businesses. The guidance kept six-foot social distancing requirements, and is set to end Aug. 23 — a day before classes are scheduled to begin at the University of Iowa.

Long-term care facility outbreaks in the state also climbed, now at 22. An outbreak is characterized when a facility has more than three positive cases.

Added to the state’s list are Dubuque County’s Grand Meadows in Asbury, which reported three positive cases.

Pottawattamie County’s Oakland Manor also recorded an outbreak, with nine cases.

One long-term care facility was removed from the state’s list — Good Samaritan Society in Newell, in Buena Vista County, had an outbreak beginning June 13.

At Solon Nursing Care Center in Johnson County, positive cases jumped to 31, from 17.

Hospitalizations in the state dropped from 230 to 220. The number of patients in intensive care has declined, to 220 from 230 the day before.

The number of patients remained unchanged, at 72, and one more person is on a ventilator — to 28.

Here are the counties with the highest daily increase as of 11 a.m. Saturday:

Polk — 118

Linn — 45

Black Hawk — 42

Pottawattamie — 33

Story — 31

Scott — 28

Dubuque — 21

Johnson — 21

Marshall — 16

Warren — 11

Woodbury — 11

Webster — 10

Comments: (319) 398-8370; sarah.watson@thegazette.com

Katie Brumbeloe of The Gazette contributed to this report.

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