CORONAVIRUS

1,384 new COVID-19 cases in Iowa, 16 more deaths

Gov. Kim Reynolds extends emergency proclamation another 30 days

A bottle of hand sanitizer sits on a cart as Des Moines Public Schools custodian Tracy Harris cleans a chair in a classr
A bottle of hand sanitizer sits on a cart as Des Moines Public Schools custodian Tracy Harris cleans a chair in a classroom at Brubaker Elementary School, Wednesday, July 8, 2020, in Des Moines, Iowa. As the Trump administration pushes full steam ahead to force schools to resume in-person education, public health experts warn that a one-size-fits-all reopening could drive infection and death rates even higher. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

On the same day that Iowa reported its third-highest number of positive COVID-19 cases, Gov. Kim Reynolds on Friday signed a new proclamation extending Iowa’s public health disaster emergency for another 30 days.

Across the state, 1,384 new virus cases were reported in the 24-hour period that ended at 11 a.m. Friday, according to data from the Iowa Department of Public Health. Iowa now has 104,606 cases.

With 6,766 test results in the 24-hour period, the state’s positivity rate is 20.46 percent.

Additionally, 16 deaths were reported, bringing the state’s death toll to 1,521.

Woodbury and Polk counties each had three new deaths. Dubuque, Lyon and Wapello counties had two deaths each, and Dallas, Fremont, Harrison, Scott and Tama counties each reported one new death. Fremont’s death was its first. Now, 91 of Iowa’s 99 counties have seen a COVID-19 death.

Of the new cases, 121 were for people who work in education. That’s the second-highest number of cases since The Gazette began tracking the category Sept. 16. The total number of education workers infected in Iowa is 5,063.

In addition, 146 of the new cases were for young people up to 17 years old. The total number of minors with COVID-19 is 9,074.

Locally, Linn County added 57 new cases, bringing the county total to 4,884. The county’s seven-day average is 44, and its positivity rate is 9.93 percent,

Johnson County added 24 cases for a total of 5,566 and has a seven-day average of 23. The county’s 24-hour positivity rate is 9.06 percent.

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Story County has 31 new cases for a total of 3,791 and a seven-day average of 19. Story’s 24-hour positivity rate is 15.2 percent.

Black Hawk County added 69 cases for a total of 5,079. Its seven-day average is 40, and its 24-hour positivity rate is 24.91 percent.

Three long-term care facilities were added to the state’s outbreak list: The Vinton Lutheran Home in Benton County has eight cases; Luther Manor Communities in Dubuque County, also has eight cases; and Montrose Health Center in Lee County has four cases.

Facilities removed from the outbreak list include Harmony House Health Care Center in Waterloo, Simpson Memorial Home in West Liberty and Akron Care Center in Plymouth County.

Hospitalization numbers declined after four days of increases. In Iowa, 468 are hospitalized for COVID-19, down from 482 on Thursday. Intensive-care patients went down from 107 to 105, and the number of patients on ventilators went down from 49 to 48.

The governor’s proclamation extends all the public health mitigation measures in place for businesses and other establishments until 11:59 p.m. Nov. 15.

The proclamation includes requirements for bars and restaurants to ensure 6 feet of physical distance between each group or individual dining or drinking; to ensure all patrons have a seat at a table or bar and consume alcohol or food while seated; and to limit congregating together closer than 6 feet. Requirements for social distancing, hygiene and other public health measures to reduce the risk of transmission also remain in place for gyms, casinos, salons, theaters and other establishments.

It does not include a face mask mandate. The governor “strongly” encourages Iowans 2 years and older to wear face masks in public settings.

Comments: (319) 398-8255; gage.miskimen@thegazette.com

Rod Boshart of The Gazette Des Moines Bureau contributed to this report.

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