Government

Trump declares federal disaster in Iowa

30 counties eligible for funding

Flash flooding in the Des Moines area dropped 8 inches of rain in a short time in some areas, clsoing off streets and causing a death. (Photo from Des Moines Police Department)
Flash flooding in the Des Moines area dropped 8 inches of rain in a short time in some areas, clsoing off streets and causing a death. (Photo from Des Moines Police Department)

DES MOINES — President Donald Trump declared Monday that a major disaster exists in the state of Iowa and ordered federal assistance to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding from June 6 to July 2.

According to the presidential disaster declaration, federal funding is available to state, tribal, and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the severe weather events.

The proclamation covers Adair, Buchanan, Buena Vista, Cerro Gordo, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Clay, Dallas, Delaware, Dickinson, Emmet, Floyd, Hamilton, Hancock, Howard, Humboldt, Kossuth, Lyon, O’Brien, Osceola, Palo Alto, Pocahontas, Polk, Sioux, Story, Warren, Webster, Winnebago, Winneshiek, and Wright counties in Iowa.

Federal funding also is available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Brock Long, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), named Timothy Scranton as the federal coordinating officer for federal recovery operations in the affected Iowa areas.

Last month, Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds sent a letter to the president requesting a federal disaster declaration for 30 Iowa counties where significant damage of at least $16 million was sustained from severe storms and flooding from June 6 to July 2.

The request covers damage to the state before tornadoes hit Pella, Marshalltown and Bondurant on July 19. A separate federal disaster request for damage from those storms is still being reviewed.

Public assistance funding is used to rebuild damaged infrastructure such as roads and bridges and to pay for emergency services during a storm and debris removal afterward. A preliminary damage assessment of the 30 counties estimated damage at $16 million to public facilities and services.

l Comments: (515) 243-7220; rod.boshart@thegazette.com

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