Government

Hinson: Greene's rhetoric 'unacceptable,' but stripping her from panels sets 'bad precedent'

Representative-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA), right, wears a #xd2;Trump Won#xd3; mask during the swearing-in of th
Representative-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA), right, wears a ÒTrump WonÓ mask during the swearing-in of the opening of the new 117th Congress on Capitol Hill on January 3, 2021 in Washington DC. Photo by Ken Cedeno/Sipa USA(Sipa via AP Images)

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Rep. Ashley Hinson, who represents Iowa’s 1st Congressional District, was not among the 11 House Republicans who joined Democrats in voting to strip a congresswoman her committee assignments, though Hinson noted she would “hold her accountable” for any incendiary rhetoric in the future.

U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, a freshman House Republican like Hinson, was stripped of her committee assignments by the House of Representatives after Greene’s past social media activity was brought to light.

That includes an assignment on the House Budget Committee, which she served on with Hinson.

“(Greene’s) previous rhetoric and conduct are unacceptable to me. The more her past statements come to light, the more trouble I see,” Hinson said in a call with reporters Friday morning.

Nonetheless, she said, “I don’t think we should be setting this precedent of stripping members of their committee assignments based on statements prior to serving in Congress.”

In 2019, House GOP leaders removed Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, who had a history of racist comments, from the Agriculture and Judiciary panels after he was quoted as wondering when “white supremacist” became an offensive term. He lost the Republican primary for his seat in 2020 and is out of Congress after serving nine terms.

Hinson noted that she’d be watching Greene’s “statements going forward,” and if Greene continued with the same rhetoric, “I definitely will call party leadership to hold her accountable.”

Similarly, Hinson said she “supported” U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming keeping her conference chair leadership position in a Republican secret ballot, despite noting she disagreed with Cheney on her support for impeaching President Donald Trump a second time.

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“I’ll just say this: Many times, I don’t vote the same way as my colleagues. But I do think Liz Cheney is an important member of our caucus,” Hinson said.

“I supported her, (Ohio Rep.) Jim Jordan did not, but we all came together with that unified message leaving that room,” Hinson continued. “That’s what we’re now focused on — making sure we’re spotlighting these issues and moving forward as a conference.”

That includes, Hinson said, stopping a $15 per hour minimum wage proposal from going forward in the House’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill, which she called a “blue state bailout” that would prevent companies from adding jobs in Iowa, where the minimum wage is $7.25 per hour.

“This one-size-fits-all mandate will kill Iowa jobs and businesses,” Hinson said, adding she would “do everything I can to make sure it’s not in the relief package.”

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