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This Democratic presidential debate could make a difference

It's the candidates' last big chance to sway Iowans before the caucuses

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders speaks Jan. 3 during an Anamosa town hall at the National Motorcycle Mu
Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders speaks Jan. 3 during an Anamosa town hall at the National Motorcycle Museum. An Iowa Poll released late Friday shows hin leading in Iowa for the first time this election season. (Jim Slosiarek/The Gazette)

DES MOINES — The six previous Democratic presidential debates have not significantly moved the needle, but this seventh one — held in Iowa, shortly before the nation’s first say in selecting a party nominee — could be different.

Six candidates in the Democratic field have qualified for Tuesday’s nationally televised debate at Drake University: Sen. Bernie Sanders, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg, former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Amy Klobuchar and businessman Tom Steyer.

In a race that features a tight pack of front-runners in polls and an electorate that still is decidedly undecided, Tuesday night’s debate could help shape the race in its final weeks before the Feb. 3 caucuses, said Drake University political science professor Rachel Paine Caufield.

“Obviously, Iowans who are participating in the caucus process have been seeing these candidates for months and months and months. This is, however, the last time that they’ll see candidates on a national stage” before the caucuses, Caufield said. “So I think as they try to make final decisions, this has the potential to be important in that decision-making calculus.”

For months, the top-polling candidates have been bunched in group well ahead of the rest of the field. And that remains the case.

A Des Moines Register/CNN/Mediacom Iowa Poll released late Friday has Sanders in the lead in Iowa for the first time this election.

The Iowa Poll showed 20 percent of likely Democratic caucusgoers named Sanders as their first choice, followed by Warren at 17 percent, Buttigieg at 16 percent and Biden at 15 percent.

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For the others making the debate stage, the Iowa Poll showed Klobuchar at 6 percent and Steyer at 2 percent.

Many Iowa Democrats say they remain undecided or willing to have their mind changed.

With the debate taking place just 20 days before the caucuses, a candidate’s performance could help sway some of those undecided voters and thus shake up the group of leaders or help a second-tier polling candidate like Klobuchar or Steyer to surge.

Iowa Democrats “know who their top candidates are. They know who they’re still considering. So a debate like this potentially allows voters to see the candidates in a new light, reintroduce themselves to some of the things they like or dislike about the candidates in this setting, as opposed to in a high-school gym, to see how it translates onto a national debate stage,” Caufield said. “As (Democrats) begin to settle on their final choice, this final debate, I think, could move some voters. The question is how many and how far.”

The debate will be the last, big Iowa audience for the candidates, said David Anderson, a political-science professor at Iowa State University.

“My guess is that this is the last chance anyone has to really move the needle. It is the sort of last, big event where they will get a lot of attention statewide,” Anderson said. “After this it’s going to be all about the ground game, which can matter a lot. But they’re not that sort of galvanizing event that candidates can lean into.”

As the leaders attempt to break out of the pack, the next tier of candidates is looking for a late surge — like John Kerry in 2004.

But for candidates who did not qualify for the debate — like entrepreneur Andrew Yang and Sen. Cory Booker — that climb has became even more difficult.

Anderson said while failing to qualify for the debate is not a caucus death sentence, it doesn’t help.

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“When (Democrats) are trying to decide who to caucus for, a candidate who isn’t making the debates has to make an argument that says this isn’t a wasted effort,” Anderson said. “If you’re torn between a couple of the candidates, the one who’s on the debate stage might be the one who seems to have more excitement.”

Caufield said the recent escalation in military conflict between the United States and Iran made it even more important for candidates to get on the debate stage.

“Particularly in these final weeks before the caucus when foreign affairs are going to take center stage, I think that that ability to stand on a national stage and sound presidential will be important in voters’ decision-making,” Caufield said. “You can’t do that if you’re not on the stage.”

Caufield said she is curious to see how candidates talk about foreign policy during the debate.

“This is not an abstract discussion anymore. This is, now, much more concrete,” she said. “I have no doubt that the candidates right now are honing their messages on Iran and Iraq.”

How to watch

What: Democratic presidential debate

When: 8 p.m. Iowa time Tuesday

Where: Drake University in Des Moines

How to watch: Live on CNN and CNN.com

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