Government

Candidate McGuire sees her science, medical background as ideal for finding solutions

Democratic gubernatorial hopeful Andy McGuire talks Monday with Naftalia Flatte (left) and Gwyneth Forsythe, both of Iowa City, while campaigning at the Hamburg Inn No. 2. (James Q. Lynch/The Gazette)
Democratic gubernatorial hopeful Andy McGuire talks Monday with Naftalia Flatte (left) and Gwyneth Forsythe, both of Iowa City, while campaigning at the Hamburg Inn No. 2. (James Q. Lynch/The Gazette)
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IOWA CITY — Politics may be more art than science, but Andy McGuire thinks her scientific and medical experience is the right preparation for being Iowa’s next governor.

What’s more, McGuire, a physician, said Monday while campaigning in Iowa City, the issues Iowans are talking about — health care and mental health care, for example — are in her wheelhouse.

“As a scientist and someone who has the health care background, I’m about finding out where we are,” she said during an event at Hamburg Inn No. 2. “I always talk about water quality, but it applies to every kind of problem. We measure so we know where we are, we know where we need to go and then you get everybody at the table.

“That’s what I’ve done in my life,” said McGuire, who is in a six-way race for the Democratic nomination next month to face Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds in the general election. “That’s what you do in science. That’s what you do in medicine. That, to me, is the way to get to solutions.”

To deliver those solutions, McGuire has to survive the primary and, if necessary, a contested state Democratic Party convention.

A recent Des Moines Register/Mediacom Iowa Poll showed none of the candidates polling at or above 35 percent — the threshold for winning the nomination outright at the June 5 primary.

Like others, McGuire is running a dual strategy to be prepared for the primary as well as a nominating convention.

She sees both as possibilities. With six candidates, voter support is fluid.

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“Nobody’s exactly running away with this, so I think people are still switching around,” she said. “When people start to get fluid and change their minds, that’s good for me.”

In the final two weeks of the primary election campaign, McGuire said she will continue to do what she’s been doing “just maybe at a more frenetic pace.”

“There’s still time,” McGuire said, adding that she’ll have television ads and mailers to reach Democratic primary voters.

“I don’t want to just talk about these things. I want to get it done,” McGuire said. “I want to get to the solutions. I think that’s the difference in me. I just want to get some things done for Iowa.”

l Comments: (319) 398-8375; james.lynch@thegazette.com

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