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Photos: Rehabilitated eagle released back into the wild

RARE volunteer and veterinary technician Michele Nigg releases a rehabilitated bald eagle near the spot where the injured bird was found near Betram. The female eagle spent four weeks with Raptor Advocacy, Rehabilitation and Education recovering from a fractured wing and being treated for high levels of lead in her blood. RARE volunteers said it was unusual for a bird with lead poisoning to survive and that the birds can pick up lead from fragments of ammunition when the birds or their prey scavenge carcasses and gut piles as well as from lead fishing tackle. Photographed on Saturday, December 22, 2018. (Cliff Jette/The Gazette)
RARE volunteer and veterinary technician Michele Nigg releases a rehabilitated bald eagle near the spot where the injured bird was found near Betram. The female eagle spent four weeks with Raptor Advocacy, Rehabilitation and Education recovering from a fractured wing and being treated for high levels of lead in her blood. RARE volunteers said it was unusual for a bird with lead poisoning to survive and that the birds can pick up lead from fragments of ammunition when the birds or their prey scavenge carcasses and gut piles as well as from lead fishing tackle. Photographed on Saturday, December 22, 2018. (Cliff Jette/The Gazette)
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RARE volunteers and veterinary technician Michele Nigg released a female eagle after she spent four weeks in recovery. The eagle had suffered a fractured wing and was being treated for high levels of lead in her blood.

Here are photos from the release on Saturday, December 22, 2018.

 
 
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