NEWS

Cedar Rapids under a flood warning: National Weather Service

Crest expected Tuesday at eight feet above major flood stage

Volunteers sandbag in front of Lush Salon in the NewBo neighborhood in Cedar Rapids in May 2013. (Kaitlyn Bernauer/The G
Volunteers sandbag in front of Lush Salon in the NewBo neighborhood in Cedar Rapids in May 2013. (Kaitlyn Bernauer/The Gazette)

The Cedar River is expected to crest next Tuesday at eight feet above major flood stage, after rainfall in northeast Iowa Wednesday night.

Cedar Rapids city officials will hold a news conference at 2 p.m. today to discuss plans for high river levels.

Cedar Rapids was placed under a flood warning by the National Weather Service before noon today.

The river is forecast to crest in Cedar Rapids at 24.1 feet by midday Tuesday, Sept. 27. The major flood stage for the Cedar River in Cedar Rapids is 16 feet.

Rainfall across northeastern and east central Iowa on Wednesday night led to flooding in the Cedar River Basin, said Peter Speck, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Davenport. A large frontal boundary storm system that has been hanging over much of Northern Iowa and southern Minnesota dropped more than 4.5 inches of precipitation Wednesday night. The Twin Cities saw about 10 inches of rainfall last night.

Spotty showers will persist throughout the rest of today in northeastern Iowa and Cedar Rapids, Speck added.

All that rain leads to rising river levels, he noted. Though forecasts are subject to change, the Cedar River will begin flooding on Sunday, Sept. 25, Speck said.

Though the river was not above flood stage as of Thursday morning, the water levels in:

l Waterloo measured 9.77 feet at 8 a.m.

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l Vinton measured at about 11 feet in Vinton around 9 a.m. The river is forecast to crest in Vinton Wednesday evening, Sept. 28, at 16 feet — half a foot below major flood stage.

l Cedar Rapids measured 9.41 feet at 10 a.m. Thursday.

Speck said Northern Iowa and southern Minnesota already are seeing effects of heavy rain, with Minnesota roads closed due to mudslides. Manhole covers in Charles City in Floyd County, Iowa, popped off after Wednesday’s rain, and roads are covered with water in Monona, in Clayton County, Thursday.

“This is not usually typical for this time of year,” Speck said of Eastern Iowa rainfall totals for August and September.

According to the National Weather Service, there was a total of 5.04 inches at The Eastern Iowa Airport in September 2015. The average September rain is 3.16 inches.

MAP: Flood threats in Iowa

 

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