Healthy Living

Offer up compassion in this stormy era

Commit to be Fit | Kylie Alger

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds gave an update on the status of new COVID-19 cases in Iowa during a press conference at the Iowa
Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds gave an update on the status of new COVID-19 cases in Iowa during a press conference at the Iowa National Guard in Johnston on Friday, May 1, 2020.

I know it’s been dark

for the longest of whiles.

What you are learning here,

can only be taught — here.

The truth found here,

can only be revealed — here.

Be here.

Sow your tears — here.

And when the moonlight rises to full

Bloom — here.

My best friend sent this poem to me after her yoga teacher shared it with her class during meditation. And even though the author, Tess Guinery, wrote this poem before the pandemic, I believe her words hold wisdom for our current experience.

For me, it’s a powerful reminder to remain present during this time (— here); to not resist the chaos, but to embrace it. What can I learn? How can I pivot? What can I control? How do I want to feel? How do I want to emerge from the quarantine?

I think it’s important to point out that even though we are collectively going through a global pandemic, the amount of “darkness” Guinery refers to in the first line of her poem looks different for everyone.

The best analogy I have heard describing our differing circumstances is this: During this pandemic, we may all be in the same boat, but we are experiencing different storms.

Depending on your circumstances, the storm could feel like an innocuous rain-delay or a life-changing tsunami. One family could be experiencing a light drizzle, feeling safe in their boat as they see lightning bolts rip through the sky in the distance; while another family may be experiencing torrential downpours and dangerous waters; while yet another family is frantically scooping water out of their boat, trying to stay afloat, not knowing when the storm is going to end.

If you are going through turbulent waters right now, my greatest intentions are with you.

And if you are experiencing light showers, it’s OK to be grateful the storm is not directly flooding your boat; but offer compassion to your neighbor who may be experiencing a life-changing tsunami.

If you are fortunate enough to find yourself in calm waters, what kind of lifeline can you extend to your neighbor who is struggling in rougher waters? Compassion is most helpful when it is expressed in action. Commit to helping a fellow “sailor” today.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADVERTISEMENT

Today is May 1. The popular saying, “April showers bring May flowers,” may be a beacon of light reminding us to remain hopeful. Depending on your circumstances, “blooming” after experiencing this extended period of darkness (like the poem describes) may seem like an eternity away.

Those feelings are valid, but also trust that you are becoming stronger and more resilient as you weather the storms that come your way.

Kylie Alger is a certified wellness coach and co-owner of the Well-Woman: Body, Mind & Spirit. Comments: kylie@thewellwoman.org

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.

Give us feedback

We value your trust and work hard to provide fair, accurate coverage. If you have found an error or omission in our reporting, tell us here.

Or if you have a story idea we should look into? Tell us here.