KIDSGAZETTE

Make your own Shape-O-Saurus

2. Once you are happy with how your dinosaur looks, peel off the backing and stick the foam shapes to the cardstock or g
2. Once you are happy with how your dinosaur looks, peel off the backing and stick the foam shapes to the cardstock or glue the pieces together.
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10:15AM | Mon, October 19, 2020

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Some scientists use shapes to help them with their work. A shape is the form or outline of an object. Can you list some shapes?

Scientists who study dinosaurs learn about the way dinosaurs lived by studying shapes preserved in very old rocks. Dinosaur teeth, bones, eggs, footprints, even leaves, preserved as fossils give us clues about dinosaurs. Here’s how you can create your very own shape-o-saurus! What do you think a shape-o-saurus could be? … A dinosaur you create out of shapes!

You will need:

1 Sheet White Paper

Adhesive Foam Shapes (or cut shapes from paper/recycled materials)

Googly Eyes (optional)

1 Stone

Acrylic Paint, Brush, Cup of water (or use permanent markers)

Crayons or Markers

Shape Hunt Sheet

1. Arrange the foam shapes (or cut shapes out of paper or recycled materials) on the white cardstock to create a dinosaur.

 
 

2. Once you are happy with how your dinosaur looks, peel off the backing and stick the foam shapes to the cardstock or glue the pieces together.

 
 

3. If you want, use crayons or markers to draw scenery around your shape-o-saurus.

 
 

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End your shape exploration with a shape hunt! Write down how many squares, rectangles, triangles, circles, ovals, diamonds and stars you see in the world around you.

Which shape did you find the most? Which shape did you find the least? Why do you think that is? Where do we see shapes in our lives? Next time you are on a walk, challenge your family or friends to see who can find the most shapes! We encourage you to explore the importance of shapes in the world. Why are tires round? Why do some bridges use arches, and others use triangles? What is the strongest shape?

This lesson was adapted from the original developed by Nicole Hanson, Brenda Welch, and Katie Peterson on behalf of Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Iowa 4-H Youth Development.

To get your child involved in fun learning opportunities, check out Clover Kids

(grades K-3), 4-H (grades 4-12), Lego Teams, and hands-on educational kits for checkout atextension.iastate.edu/linn/4h.

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach in Linn County helps build a strong Iowa by engaging Iowans in research, education, and extension experiences to address current and emerging real-life challenges. The 4-H Youth Development program empowers youth to reach their full potential through youth-adult partnerships and research-based experiences. Linn County Extension Office website: extension.iastate.edu/linn

KIDSGAZETTE ARTICLES

10:15AM | Mon, October 19, 2020

09:30AM | Mon, October 19, 2020

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