KIDSGAZETTE

How to fold a paper airplane

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11:00AM | Mon, August 10, 2020

11:00AM | Fri, August 07, 2020

11:00AM | Fri, August 07, 2020

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According to the Academy of Model Aeronautics, the paper airplane has a long history. Some of the first paper airplane designs came from the ancient art of Japanese origami. Early pioneers of the sky also folded paper airplanes to help them troubleshoot their aircraft designs. Jack Northrop, the co-founder of the Lockheed Corporation, a company that builds airplanes, used paper airplanes for his test models.

The perfect paper airplane is hard to fold, but these steps from the AMA just might help. Use the template in the paper to help you out.

1. Start by folding the paper vertically creating a valley. Unfold and flatten the paper.

2. Fold down the top two corners to the center of the paper so it resembles a house.

3. Turn the paper over and fold down the pointed top at the horizontal dotted line.

4. Fold along the original “valley.”

5. Fold down the first set of dotted lines.

6. Fold down the wings on the dotted lines so you can see the logo.

7. Place a small piece of tape near the nose to keep the airplane all together. You can also attach a paper clip to the nose to add weight.

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8. To fly, hold the airplane underneath the wings by pinching where the triangle is folded. Hold it roughly at shoulder height and toss gently forward.

You can create a target on your floor with paper or a Hula-Hoop and see whose plane can fly the fastest and farthest. You can find activities like this and more on The Kids Gazette website, thegazette.com/kids, or go to the AMA website for even more fun, modelaircraft.org

KIDSGAZETTE ARTICLES

11:00AM | Mon, August 10, 2020

11:00AM | Fri, August 07, 2020

11:00AM | Fri, August 07, 2020

View More KIDSGAZETTE Articles

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