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Investigation: Iowa second among top 25 schools in football player arrests

Former Iowa football player Derrell Johnson-Koulianos testifies during the second-degree sexual abuse trial of former pl
Former Iowa football player Derrell Johnson-Koulianos testifies during the second-degree sexual abuse trial of former player Cedric Everson Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2011 at the Johnson County District Courthouse in Iowa City, Iowa. Everson is accused of sexually assaulting a female student athlete in a Hillcrest residence hall dorm room on the UI campus in Oct. 2007. (Pool Photo/Brian Ray)

An investigation of 25 top college football programs by Sports Illustrated and CBS News has revealed that Oklahoma and TCU were the only ones to do criminal background checks on recruits.

SI and CBS News did various criminal background checks on all the players on the rosters of the teams in Sports Illustrated's 2010 preseason top 25 as of Sept. 1.

According to the story posted Wednesday on SI.com, the study found about 7 percent of the 2,837 players 204 total "had been in trouble with the law either before or after entering college." Pittsburgh topped the list with 22 players with criminal records. Iowa and Arkansas were tied, with 18 player arrests each.

"Seven percent, that's way too high," NCAA President Mark Emmert told SI. "I think two percent is too high. You certainly don't want a large number of people with criminal backgrounds involved in activities that represent the NCAA."

There are no available correlating figures for the general student populations of those universities.

The report also stated in the cases where an outcome was known, "players were guilty or paid some penalty in nearly 60 percent of the 277 total incidents."The other universities that were studied were: Boise State, Penn State, Virginia Tech, Wisconsin, Florida State, Miami, Ohio State, Florida, Oregon, Southern California, Alabama, North Carolina, Cincinnati, Utah, Nebraska, Georgia Tech, Oregon State, LSU, Texas and Stanford.

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