Public Safety

Cedar Rapids man to serve 3 years in federal prison for making counterfeit bills, identity theft

Participated in check fraud scheme

Joshua L. Chalk
Joshua L. Chalk

CEDAR RAPIDS — A Cedar Rapids man was sentenced Wednesday in federal court to three years in prison for manufacturing counterfeit bills to buy pizza and other items and also helping others in a stolen checks scheme.

Joshua Chalk, 31, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court last year to manufacturing counterfeit currency and aggravated identity theft. During his plea hearing, Chalk admitted he manufactured a $100 bill in March 2017. He was making counterfeit bills to buy pizza and other items in the Cedar Rapids area. Chalk provided counterfeit bills to his girlfriend, who would order the pizzas, court records show.

Chalk also admitted he participated in a check fraud scheme with Kevin Kappmeyer and Darrell Turner to remove checks drawn on accounts of various banks from stolen mail. They would alter the payee names on the checks and attempt to cash those checks. Chalk said he attempted to cash an altered check on Dec. 26, 2016, at a local check cashing company.

U.S. District Senior Judge Linda Reade also ordered Chalk to pay $11,463 in restitution to victims.

Turner, 50, was previously convicted of possession of stolen mail matter and aggravated identity theft and sentenced in October to over three years in prison. At his plea hearing in April, Turner admitted he possessed a check that had been in mail stolen from a Cedar Rapids mailbox. Turner tried to cash the check on Jan. 6 at a local bank.

Reade also ordered Turner was also ordered Turner to pay $7,271 in restitution to victims.

Kappmeyer, 51, was convicted in June of possession of stolen mail matter and aggravated identity theft and sentenced to over three years in prison. At his plea hearing, Kappmeyer said he possessed a check that had been in stolen mail addressed to a company in Marion. Kappmeyer cashed the check on Jan. 4.

Kappmeyer also was ordered to pay $2,680 in victim restitution.

Judge Reade increased sentences for Turner and Kappmeyer because of their “horrible” criminal histories, she noted during the hearings. Turner’s criminal activity stretches back to 1985, with numerous convictions for theft and forgery.

Kappmeyer has a criminal history that goes back to 1981, when he was 14-years-old. He has convictions from four states.

l Comments: (319) 398-8318; trish.mehaffey@thegazette.com

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