Nation & World

Facebook suspends 200 apps

Action follows Cambridge Analytica scandal

Bloomberg

CEO Mark Zuckerberg says Facebook will examine tens of thousands of apps that could have accessed or collected large amounts of users’ personal information before the site’s more restrictive data rules for third-party developers took effect in 2015.
Bloomberg CEO Mark Zuckerberg says Facebook will examine tens of thousands of apps that could have accessed or collected large amounts of users’ personal information before the site’s more restrictive data rules for third-party developers took effect in 2015.

Facebook said Monday morning it had suspended roughly 200 apps amid an ongoing investigation prompted by the Cambridge Analytica scandal into whether services on the site had improperly used or collected users’ personal data.

Facebook did not immediately provide detail on which apps were suspended or how many people had used them.

The company said in an update — its first look since the social network announced the internal audit in March — that the apps would now undergo a “thorough investigation” into whether they had misused user data.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg has said the company will examine tens of thousands of apps that could have accessed or collected large amounts of users’ personal information before the site’s more restrictive data rules for third-party developers took effect in 2015.

The company said teams of internal and external experts will conduct interviews and lead on-site inspections of certain apps during its ongoing audit. Thousands of apps have been investigated so far, the company said, adding that any app that refuses to cooperate or failed the audit would be banned from the site.

The app used by Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy hired by President Donald Trump and other Republicans, was able to pull detailed data on 87 million people, including from the app’s direct users and their friends, who had not overtly consented to the app’s use.

The announcement comes ahead of a Wednesday hearing on Capitol Hill focused on Cambridge Analytica and data privacy. Lawmakers are expected to hear from Christopher Wylie, a former employee at the company who brought its business practices to light earlier this year, though the Senate Judiciary Committee has not yet released a final witness list.

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