Government

Hubbell, Reynolds visions vary

Governor's race could be most expensive in Iowa history

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds signs the Iowa income tax bill into law on May 30 in Hiawatha. The governor said the upcoming gubernatorial contest will probably be one of the most expensive races in Iowa electoral history. (Jim Slosiarek/The Gazette)
Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds signs the Iowa income tax bill into law on May 30 in Hiawatha. The governor said the upcoming gubernatorial contest will probably be one of the most expensive races in Iowa electoral history. (Jim Slosiarek/The Gazette)
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SIOUX CITY —- Iowans now know the two major party nominees fighting to be the state’s next governor, and Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds and Democrat Fred Hubbell will present differing visions for the state over the next five months to Election Day in November.

Hubbell came to Sioux City in northwest Iowa on Friday to thank voters and redirect his efforts to the general election campaign.

Earlier in the week, Reynolds was in Sioux City, saying the upcoming gubernatorial contest will probably “one of the most expensive” races in Iowa electoral history.

Roughly $10.6 million was spent in the last gubernatorial contest in 2014.

In a stop at the Woodbury County Democratic Party headquarters, Hubbell basked in the enthusiasm of 70 people packed into the room.

“We are going to work hard and recreate an even bigger wave than we did on Tuesday night,” he said.

Hubbell cited how nearly 180,000 Democrats voted in the Tuesday primary, which is a record for the party in a primary, although it trails the record for Republicans.

Hubbell said Iowans will routinely hear from him that the laws approved by Reynolds and statehouse Republicans the last two years have hurt Iowans. He pointed to insufficient funding for education and health care.

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“We need to put people first in the state,” Hubbell said, through a budget that delivers key needs to rank-and-file Iowans.

Hubbell said he will “stop the shortsighted corporate giveaways” to firms that don’t need them and place that money into better initiatives.

“We can create better jobs in the state and raise incomes for everybody,” he said.

Reynolds, who became governor when Terry Branstad resigned to become ambassador to China, said people like that she is authentic and has a positive tone.

“My story is the Iowa story. I came from pretty humble beginnings,” she said. “I think I have a good narrative to run on. But we are never satisfied with the status quo.”

She declined to draw distinctions between Hubbell and herself as nominees, while Iowa Republicans have described Hubbell as a rich man who is out of touch with Iowans. Also, in her victory speech Tuesday, Reynolds cited Hubbell’s wealth.

Hubbell said he’s not going to pay attention to such “personal attacks” and will direct his attention to airing the downside of Reynolds’ record.

Reynolds said she’s heard the naysaying aired by Democrats who contend Iowa is in perilous condition.

She said she wants to know the outlook from “third-party validators,” so she keeps speaking with businesses to get the right feel for how the state is doing. Reynolds said economic development is poised to boom in Iowa.

“This economy will explode if we can get them the workers that they need,” she said.

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Last week, a poll by Morningside College in Sioux City showed 53 percent of poll respondents approve of how Reynolds is handling her job, while 36 percent disapproved.

Eighty-three percent of Republicans approved of her job performance, while 69 percent of Democrats disapproved.

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