Hearing on Kinnick-like house resumes Friday in Iowa City

Location of 6:30 p.m. meeting changed

Board of Adjustment members Becky Soglin (from left), Tim Weitzel, Chairman Larry Baker, and T. Gene Chrischilles look at a scale drawing of Lusk Avenue with pictures of fire fighting equipment on it during a hearing of the Iowa City Board of Adjustment at City Hall in Iowa City on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. The purpose of the hearing was to consider an appeal filed by a group of residents calling themselves the Neighbors of Manville Heights Association who are aiming to stop landowner Reed Carlson from building the 7,500-square-foot Kinnick-like house at 101 Lusk Ave. (Stephen Mally/The Gazette)
Board of Adjustment members Becky Soglin (from left), Tim Weitzel, Chairman Larry Baker, and T. Gene Chrischilles look at a scale drawing of Lusk Avenue with pictures of fire fighting equipment on it during a hearing of the Iowa City Board of Adjustment at City Hall in Iowa City on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. The purpose of the hearing was to consider an appeal filed by a group of residents calling themselves the Neighbors of Manville Heights Association who are aiming to stop landowner Reed Carlson from building the 7,500-square-foot Kinnick-like house at 101 Lusk Ave. (Stephen Mally/The Gazette)

IOWA CITY — A hearing to determine whether an Iowa City landowner can build a 7,500-square-foot home designed to look like Kinnick Stadium continues Friday with a decision on the matter expected.

The Iowa City Board of Adjustment meets at 6:30 p.m. at the Environmental Education Center at East Side Recycling Center, 2401 Scott Boulevard SE. This is a different location than previously announced for the meeting.

The quasi-judicial board is considering an appeal filed by a group of residents calling themselves the Neighbors of Manville Heights Association. The group is aiming to stop landowner Frederic Reed Carlson, of Decorah, from building the house at 101 Lusk Ave.

The residents filed the appeal earlier this year after Iowa City officials granted Carlson a building permit and approved a site plan for the home. The group says the city erred in classifying the house as a single-family dwelling, wrongfully approved the site plan and should not have issued a building permit.

Carlson said the home would be used for family gatherings and that it meets all the requirements for a single-family home.

Doug Boothroy, director of Neighborhood and Development Services for Iowa City, also has said city staff carefully considered the building proposal and site plan before approving a building permit. He said city code allows great latitude in what is considered a single-family dwelling and the Kinnick-style house meets the criteria.

The hearing began on Sept. 14 and continued Sept. 21 with no decision reached by Board of Adjustment members Tim Weitzel, T. Gene Chrischilles, Becky Soglin and Chairman Larry Baker after a combined 11-plus hours. Board member Constance Goeb has recused herself from the hearing.

Baker has said he expects a decision to be reached on Friday.

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The public hearing has closed, which means no further public comment or testimony is to be heard by the board on Friday.

The decision of the board is binding and can be challenged only through an appeal to district court.

If You Go

• What: Iowa City Board of Adjustment hearing

• When: 6:30 p.m. Friday

• Where: Environmental Education Center at East Side Recycling Center, 2401 Scott Boulevard SE, Iowa City

• Why: Continued hearing of appeal from the Neighbors of Manville Heights Association, which wants to stop construction of a Kinnick Stadium-like house at 101 Lusk Ave.

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