Government

Governor Reynolds, Iowa GOP leaders continue tax-cut negotiations

Gov. Kim Reynolds responds to a question about gun control during an event to promote the Future Ready Iowa Act, which was recently passed by the state legislature and signed into law by Gov. Reynolds at the Hy-Vee Market Grille in Coralville on Thursday, April 5, 2018. Reynolds touted the state's recent mental health and suicide prevention legislation and took questions from the public on issues ranging from gun control to whether she would send national guard troops to the southern boarder of the U.S. if they were reqeusted. (Rebecca F. Miller/The Gazette)
Gov. Kim Reynolds responds to a question about gun control during an event to promote the Future Ready Iowa Act, which was recently passed by the state legislature and signed into law by Gov. Reynolds at the Hy-Vee Market Grille in Coralville on Thursday, April 5, 2018. Reynolds touted the state's recent mental health and suicide prevention legislation and took questions from the public on issues ranging from gun control to whether she would send national guard troops to the southern boarder of the U.S. if they were reqeusted. (Rebecca F. Miller/The Gazette)

DES MOINES — Gov. Kim Reynolds and top Republicans in the House and Senate held private talks again Thursday at the Statehouse, but did not reach agreement on plans to cut state income taxes and set the state budget for fiscal 2019.

“We’re still talking. We’re still working,” Reynolds told reporters Thursday, saying she was optimistic the negotiations eventually would achieve a consensus.

“It’s my goal to get a tax bill done this year,” the governor added. “It’s my goal to get a tax bill done this year.

“It’s just how we get there, when we get there and what the details look like.”

Senate President Charles Schneider, R-West Des Moines, said all sides were narrowing their differences, but the earliest he expected negotiators would have details of a package to release likely would be Friday.

House and Senate leaders have indicated the closed-door discussions regarding the competing plans offered by the governor and both chambers — with cuts ranging from $1.3 billion to $2 billion over five years — basically boiled down to how the final approach is implemented, what elements to include and in what time frame.

The goal, they have said, is to give Iowans the full benefit of federal income tax cuts along with additional state relief.

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