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University of Iowa, University of Northern Iowa name new College of Education deans

Both to start this summer

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The University of Iowa has chosen a new dean for its College of Education — Daniel L. Clay, a former UI faculty member and current College of Education dean of the University of Missouri.

Clay, 48, will start as UI’s 17th College of Education dean on July 1 and will make an annual salary of $305,000, according to a UI news release. He will succeed Nicholas Colangelo, who has been on the job since 2012 and is planning to retire June 30.

Colangelo’s retirement has been “in the works for some time,” according to a UI spokeswoman Lois Gray, “so he can spend more time being a grandpa and with his spouse, who has already retired, as well as do more traveling, writing, and consulting as an expert in gifted education and talent development.”

Clay, according to the UI news release, is a nationally-recognized scholar and fellow of the American Educational Research Association and the American Psychological Association. He has written an award-winning book on “Helping Schoolchildren with Chronic Health Conditions,” and been involved in business start-ups in and outside education.

“Dr. Clay brings to the UI a remarkable record of success as a dean,” said UI Provost Barry Butler, who made the appointment, which is subject to approval from the Board of Regents. “One measure of that success is how he has been able to advance his current college’s national reputation.”

The national search for a new UI dean was chaired by Debora Liddell, professor and departmental executive officer of educational policy and leadership studies, and UI College of Engineering Dean Alec Scranton.

Clay received a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the College of Scholastica in Duluth, Minn., and a Master of Arts in educational and counseling psychology from the University of Missouri. He earned a doctorate in counseling psychology from the University of Missouri and a higher education administration certificate through the Management Development Program at Harvard University.

He also has a Master of Business Administration from the University of Missouri.

Clay was a tenure-track faculty member at UI from 1997 to 2006 in the College of Education’s counseling psychology program, and he said Iowa City is special to both he and his wife.

“My wife, Kelly, and I moved to Iowa City right after we married, and our three sons were born there,” Clay says. “This is a unique opportunity to return to a place that is special to both of us. My new role will enable me to expand my academic entrepreneurship experience and vision not only for the college but campuswide.”

The University of Northern Iowa in January also named a new College of Education Dean. Gaetane Jean-Marie will start on the job June 30 — subject to regents approval, according to a UNI news release.

Jean-Marie is a professor and chair of the Department of Educational Leadership, Evaluation and Organizational Development at the University of Louisville in Kentucky. She earned a doctorate in leadership and cultural studies from the University of North Carolina and a Master of Arts in criminal justice and Bachelor of Arts in political science from Rutgers University.

UNI Provost Jim Wohlpart said Jean-Marie brings a “strong background in educational leadership.”

“She has more than $2 million in funded grants, has co-authored two books and coedited four others, and has many article and conference presentations,” he said in a statement. “Her leadership philosophy is inclusive, innovative and data-informed, and she cares first and foremost about students and student learning, which is very important at UNI.”

Jean-Marie is succeeding Dwight Watson, who left UNI in May 2015 for the provost position at Southwest Minnesota State University. Victoria Robinson, head of UNI’s Department of Education Leadership and Postsecondary Education, has been serving as interim dean.

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