Your guide to trick-or-treating hours in Linn and Johnson counties

Forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies and low of 28 degrees

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Here is a list of trick-or-treating hours Tuesday for communities in Linn and Johnson counties.

In cases where there are no set hours, residents, in many cases, are asked to turn on their porch lights when they are ready to greet trick-or-treaters and turn them off when finished.

In the Cedar Rapids and Iowa City areas, the National Weather Service is forecasting partly cloudy skies with a low around 28 degrees and winds out of the south at 5 to 10 mph.

Linn County

Alburnett — 5 to 7 p.m.

Bertram — Begins at dusk. No set hours.

Cedar Rapids — Begins at dusk. No set hours.

Center Point — 5 to 7:30 p.m.

Central City — 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Coggon — 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Ely — 5:30 to 8 p.m. The Ely Fire Department is handing out glow sticks to trick-or-treaters from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at the Ely Fire Station, 1300 Main St.

Fairfax — Begins at dusk. No set hours.

Hiawatha — Beings at dusk. No set hours.

Lisbon — 5 to 7 p.m.

Marion — No set hours.

Mount Vernon — 5 to 8 p.m.

Palo — 4:30 to 8 p.m.

Prairieburg — No set hours.

Robins — Dusk to 8 p.m.

Springville — Begins at dusk. No set hours.

Walford — Begins at dusk. No set hours.

Walker — 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Firefighters plan to hand out treats at Rowley and Ely streets.

Johnson County

Coralville — 5:30 to 8 p.m.

Hills — 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Iowa City — Dusk to 8 p.m.

Lone Tree — 6 to 8 p.m.

North Liberty — 5 to 8 p.m.

Oxford — 6 to 8 p.m.

Shueyville — Begins at dusk. No set hours.

Solon — 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Swisher — 5:30 to 8 p.m.

Tiffin — 5 to 7 p.m.

University Heights — 6 to 8 p.m.

Safety first

Meanwhile, area law enforcement agencies are reminding area residents to think about safety as it relates to Halloween and trick-or-treating.

Here are some guidelines to consider:

-- Make sure that costumes allow trick-or-treaters to see and walk safely. Avoid long, billowing fabrics that drag on the ground, costume footwear (wear sturdy shoes), or masks that obstruct the ability to see or breathe. Cut out larger openings for eyes, nose and mouth, if necessary.

-- Trick-or-treaters should be visible. Carry a flashlight or wear something lighted, such as a glow bracelet or necklace, or shoes that light up, or add reflective tape to a Halloween costume or coat.

-- Parents, guardians or a responsible older youth should accompany trick-or-treaters. Visit homes in familiar neighborhoods where the porch light is on and the area is well-lit. Make sure children understand that they are never to enter a stranger’s home. Stay on the sidewalk rather than cutting across yards.

-- Instruct kids to stay away from candles and open flames. Be sure they know how to stop, drop and roll if their clothing catches fire. Adults are urged to use battery-powered candles in their jack-o’-lanterns, and are also advised to make sure that the decorations they place on sidewalks, porches, steps or other approaches do not pose a tripping or safety hazard to trick-or-treaters.

-- Halloween treats should not be eaten until they’re brought home and examined by parents. When in doubt, throw it out.

-- Drivers should be especially alert on Halloween. Keep an eye out for children who may be dressed in dark clothing or walking on roadways, medians and curbs, or who may dart out from between parked cars. Also, be sure to enter and exit driveways and alleys carefully.

-- Halloween is often a time for pranks that may have the potential to harm a person or property. If you see any unlawful or suspicious activity, call 911 to report it.

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