Food & Drink

Flour power: Gluten-free baking means trying different types of flour

Morel scones are made from fresh morel mushrooms—or any other edible kind of mushroom—in Lansing on Sunday, May 27, 2018. A late spring means that morels in shadier areas have come up later than normal this year. (Rebecca F. Miller/The Gazette)
Morel scones are made from fresh morel mushrooms—or any other edible kind of mushroom—in Lansing on Sunday, May 27, 2018. A late spring means that morels in shadier areas have come up later than normal this year. (Rebecca F. Miller/The Gazette)
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All-purpose flour used to be my best friend. Just about every good baking recipe calls for it, right? Sure, the eggs add moisture and you can play around with different things to add flavor — extract, citrus zest — but flour is the backbone of any cookie or cake.

Then I discovered that gluten did not get along with my digestive system, and I had to say goodbye to my dependable friend all-purpose flour.

Little did I realize, that there is a whole world of flours. It was a tad overwhelming, at first, standing in the natural foods section of the grocery store and looking at rows and rows of flours — rice, almond, oat, millet.

I’ve slowly started experimenting with the different kinds — I think I currently have five different kinds of flour in my kitchen — and it’s been so interesting to see the different textures and tastes these gluten free flours can bring.

It’s meant a lot of research and a lot of reading. I’m lucky to live in the age of the internet — there’s so many gluten-free blogs out there with tips and information. If you’re new to gluten-free baking, I’d highly recommend the blog Gluten Free Goddess — she has great tips.

It’s also where I found the recipe for these scones. And let me tell you, they are amazing.

Over Memorial Day Weekend, I went up to northeast Iowa with some friends. We decided to go morel hunting — to be transparent, I ended up drinking coffee in the cabin while they searched the woods in the 90-degree weather — so I wanted to find something savory and delicious to put the delicate mushrooms in.

The original recipe calls for rosemary and olives but we used mushrooms and thyme. And let me tell you — they’re hearty, they’re fresh, y’all, they’re incredible.

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These scones require a fair amount of different flours, along with xanthan gum, which helps gluten-free flours bond together better, so if you’re feeling adventurous, give them a try. You won’t regret it.

Mushrooms and Thyme Scones

Makes eight scones.

1 cup certified, gluten-free oat flour

1/2 cup potato starch

1/4 cup rice flour

1/4 cup almond flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 1/2 teaspoons xanthan gum

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon dried thyme

3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

2 eggs, beaten

1/4 cup olive oil

1/2 cup almond milk

1 teaspoon lemon juice

1/2 cup morel mushrooms

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a mixing bowl, whisk together the flours, starch, baking powder, baking soda, thyme, salt, ground pepper and garlic powder.

Add eggs, oil, non-dairy milk, and lemon juice, and beat until combined. The batter will be sticky. Fold in mushrooms.

Mold dough into a ball and flatten — it’ll be a little sticky. Put dough on prepared baking sheet and sprinkle more thyme on top.

Bake on the center rack for about 10 to 12 minutes. Take the dough out of the oven and cut into eight triangles. Put back into over and cook for 3 to 5 minutes more, making sure scones are golden brown and cooked through.

Source: Adapted from GlutenFreeGoddess.blogspot.com

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