ARTICLE

Cleanup events take place in Iowa City, Cedar Rapids

Tires, furniture among items discarded

Solid Waste employee Ryan Rasmussen tosses scrap metal onto a pile bound for recycling during the fall CleanUpCR event at the A Street SW facility of the Cedar Rapids/Linn County Solid Waste Agency on Saturday, September 14, 2013 in Cedar Rapids. Residents could drop off tires, wood waste and scrap metal along with furniture and large household items. On September 28th another drop event will be held from 9am to 2pm for electronics and household hazardous materials. (Cliff Jette/The Gazette-KCRG TV9)
Solid Waste employee Ryan Rasmussen tosses scrap metal onto a pile bound for recycling during the fall CleanUpCR event at the A Street SW facility of the Cedar Rapids/Linn County Solid Waste Agency on Saturday, September 14, 2013 in Cedar Rapids. Residents could drop off tires, wood waste and scrap metal along with furniture and large household items. On September 28th another drop event will be held from 9am to 2pm for electronics and household hazardous materials. (Cliff Jette/The Gazette-KCRG TV9)

With a touch of autumn in the air, residents in Iowa City and Cedar Rapids rid their surroundings of old tires, furniture and other large items Saturday.

Residents in Cedar Rapids dropped off items at the A Street SW facility of the Cedar Rapids/Linn County Solid Waste Agency. Along with tires and furniture, wood and scrap metal also was accepted. Another event will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 28 for electronics and household hazardous materials.

In Iowa City, meanwhile, about 70 volunteers worked alongside city employees during the third annual Iowa River Clean-Up event.

They traveled down a 9 1/2 mile section of the river in canoes and cleared out items including tires, bottles and even a large sofa.

“When you have a couple of canoes strapped together it’s amazing what you can get out of the river,” said Dan Ceynar, Iowa Flood Center coordinator.

Carol Sweeting, Iowa City Public Works co-coordinator, said a lot of the items found were old.

“Our water quality, our recreation on the river, everything depends on what we throw out and whether or not it’s safe to be in there,” Sweeting said.

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